Fir

Fir (Abies) is a genus of 48–55 species of evergreen coniferous tree in the family Pinaceae. It is found through much of North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa, occurring in mountains over most of the range. Firs are most closely related to the genus Cedrus (cedar); Douglas-firs are not true firs, being of the genus Pseudotsuga.

All native species reach heights of 10–80 m (30–260 ft) tall and trunk diameters of 0.5–4 m (2–12 ft) when mature. Firs can be distinguished from other members of the pine family by their needle-like leaves, attached to the twig by a base that resembles a small suction cup; and by erect, cylindrical cones 5–25 cm (2–10 in) long that disintegrate at maturity to release the winged seeds. Identification of the species is based on the size and arrangement of the leaves, the size and shape of the cones, and whether the bract scales of the cones are long and exserted, or short and hidden inside the cone.

Read more about Fir:  Classification, Uses and Ecology

Famous quotes containing the word fir:

    Below me trees unnumbered rise,
    Beautiful in various dyes:
    The gloomy pine, the poplar blue,
    The yellow beech, the sable yew,
    The slender fir that taper grows,
    The sturdy oak with broad-spread boughs.
    John Dyer (1699–1758)

    I remember, I remember
    The fir trees dark and high;
    I used to think their slender tops
    Were close against the sky;
    It was a childish ignorance,
    But now ‘tis little joy
    To know I’m further off from Heaven
    Than when I was a boy.
    Thomas Hood (1799–1845)

    It is remarkable with what pure satisfaction the traveler in these woods will reach his camping-ground on the eve of a tempestuous night like this, as if he had got to his inn, and, rolling himself in his blanket, stretch himself on his six-feet-by-two bed of dripping fir twigs, with a thin sheet of cotton for roof, snug as a meadow-mouse in its nest.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)