Finite Impulse Response

Finite Impulse Response

In signal processing, a finite impulse response (FIR) filter is a filter whose impulse response (or response to any finite length input) is of finite duration, because it settles to zero in finite time. This is in contrast to infinite impulse response (IIR) filters, which may have internal feedback and may continue to respond indefinitely (usually decaying).

The impulse response of an Nth-order discrete-time FIR filter (i.e., with a Kronecker delta impulse input) lasts for N + 1 samples, and then settles to zero.

FIR filters can be discrete-time or continuous-time, and digital or analog.

Read more about Finite Impulse Response:  Definition, Properties, Impulse Response, Filter Design, Moving Average Example

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