Who is henry david thoreau?

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.

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Famous quotes containing the words henry david thoreau, david thoreau, henry david, henry, david and/or thoreau:

    He was even too well-bred to be thoroughly bred.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The canoe and yellow birch, beech, maple, and elm are Saxon and Norman, but the spruce and fir, and pines generally, are Indian.
    —Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The Grecian are youthful and erring and fallen gods, with the vices of men, but in many important respects essentially of the divine race.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The most considerable difference I note among men is not in their readiness to fall into error, but in their readiness to acknowledge these inevitable lapses.
    —Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)

    As I walked on the glacis I heard the sound of a bagpipe from the soldiers’ dwellings in the rock, and was further soothed and affected by the sight of a soldier’s cat walking up a cleated plank in a high loophole designed for mus-catry, as serene as Wisdom herself, and with a gracefully waving motion of her tail, as if her ways were ways of pleasantness and all her paths were peace.
    —Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    It is remarkable that almost all speakers and writers feel it to be incumbent on them, sooner or later, to prove or acknowledge the personality of God. Some Earl of Bridgewater, thinking it better late than never, has provided for it in his will. It is a sad mistake.
    —Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)