Mixed

Mixed is the past tense of mix. It may also refer to:

  • Mixed breed, an animal whose parents are from different breeds or species
  • Mixed anomaly, in theoretical physics, an example of an anomaly
  • Mixed data sampling, an econometric model developed by Ghysels
  • Mixed Doubles (play), a play that was first performed
  • Mixed drink, see cocktail
  • Mixed feelings, ambivalence
  • Mixed forest, see Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests
  • Mixed gauge, see Dual gauge
  • Mixed government, a form of government that integrated facets of democracy, oligarchy, and monarchy
  • Mixed inhibition, a combination of two different types of reversible enzyme inhibition
  • Mixed language, a language that arises when two languages are in contact
  • Mixed Martial Arts, a combat sport in which two competitors use different martial arts for fighting
  • Mixed media, in visual art, refers to an artwork in the making of which more than one medium has been employed.
  • Mixed metaphor, see Metaphor (language)
  • Mixed oxide fuel, see Nuclear reprocessing
  • Mixed reality, the merging of real world and virtual worlds
  • Mixed spices, a common sweet blend of spices
  • Mixed strategy, used in game theory economics
  • Mixtape, a home-made compilation of songs
  • Multiracial, a person who is of multiple races.

Famous quotes containing the word mixed:

    Memory is a wonderfully useful tool, and without it judgement does its work with difficulty; it is entirely lacking in me.... Now, the more I distrust my memory, the more confused it becomes. It serves me better by chance encounter; I have to solicit it nonchalantly. For if I press it, it is stunned; and once it has begun to totter, the more I probe it, the more it gets mixed up and embarrassed. It serves me at its own time, not at mine.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

    The millions of grains are black, white, tan, and gray,
    and mixed with quartz grains, rose and amethyst.
    Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979)

    What an antithetical mind!—tenderness, roughness—delicacy, coarseness—sentiment, sensuality—soaring and grovelling, dirt and deity—all mixed up in that one compound of inspired clay!
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)