Popular

Popular may refer to:

  • An adjective referring to any people or population
  • Social status, the quality of being well-liked or well-known
  • Popularity, the quality of being well-liked
  • The mainstream, the quality of being common, well-received, in demand, widely understood
    • Popular culture, popular fiction, popular music. popular science
    • Informal usage or custom, as in Popular names, terminology or Nomenclature, as opposed to formal or scientific names, terminology, or nomenclature.
    • Frequently used or selected options, such as given names that are popular in the sense that they occur at high frequency in a population.
  • Populace, the total population of a certain place
    • Populism, a political philosophy seeking to use the instruments of the state to benefit the people as a whole
    • Populous, a 1989 computer game, the seminal god game; see also Populous (series)
  • Popular (TV series), a teenage dramedy on the WB
  • Popular Holdings, a Singapore-based educational book company
  • Popular, Inc., a Puerto Rican-based financial services company, also known as Banco Popular inc
  • The Popular Magazine an American literary magazine that ran for 612 issues from November 1903 to October 1931
  • The Popular (Department Store) was a local chain of department stores in El Paso, Texas that was established in 1902 and closed in 1995

Read more about Popular:  Music

Famous quotes containing the word popular:

    Both gossip and joking are intrinsically valuable activities. Both are essentially social activities that strengthen interpersonal bonds—we do not tell jokes and gossip to ourselves. As popular activities that evade social restrictions, they often refer to topics that are inaccessible to serious public discussion. Gossip and joking often appear together: when we gossip we usually tell jokes and when we are joking we often gossip as well.
    Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev, Israeli philosopher. “The Vindication of Gossip,” Good Gossip, University Press of Kansas (1994)

    What is saved in the cinema when it achieves art is a spontaneous continuity with all mankind. It is not an art of the princes or the bourgeoisie. It is popular and vagrant. In the sky of the cinema people learn what they might have been and discover what belongs to them apart from their single lives.
    John Berger (b. 1926)

    I do not see why, since America and her autumn woods have been discovered, our leaves should not compete with the precious stones in giving names to colors; and, indeed, I believe that in course of time the names of some of our trees and shrubs, as well as flowers, will get into our popular chromatic nomenclature.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)