History of Baseball in The United States

The history of baseball in the United States can be traced to the 18th century, when amateurs played a baseball-like game by their own informal rules using improvised equipment. The popularity of the sport inspired the semipro and professional baseball clubs in the 1860s.

Read more about History Of Baseball In The United States:  Early History, Growth, Professionalism, Rise of The Major Leagues, The Dead-ball Era: 1900 To 1919, Overview, The Negro Leagues, Babe Ruth and The End of The Dead-ball Era, The War Years, Racial Integration in Baseball, The Major Leagues Move West, Pitching Dominance and Rules Changes, Players Assert Themselves, The Marketing and Hype Era

Famous quotes containing the words united states, history of, history, baseball, united and/or states:

    I feel most at home in the United States, not because it is intrinsically a more interesting country, but because no one really belongs there any more than I do. We are all there together in its wholly excellent vacuum.
    Wyndham Lewis (1882–1957)

    The steps toward the emancipation of women are first intellectual, then industrial, lastly legal and political. Great strides in the first two of these stages already have been made of millions of women who do not yet perceive that it is surely carrying them towards the last.
    Ellen Battelle Dietrick, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 13, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)

    The principle that human nature, in its psychological aspects, is nothing more than a product of history and given social relations removes all barriers to coercion and manipulation by the powerful.
    Noam Chomsky (b. 1928)

    The talk shows are stuffed full of sufferers who have regained their health—congressmen who suffered through a serious spell of boozing and skirt-chasing, White House aides who were stricken cruelly with overweening ambition, movie stars and baseball players who came down with acute cases of wanting to trash hotel rooms while under the influence of recreational drugs. Most of them have found God, or at least a publisher.
    Calvin Trillin (b. 1935)

    The United States is not a nation to which peace is a necessity.
    Grover Cleveland (1837–1908)

    Action from principle, the perception and the performance of right, changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was. It not only divides States and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)