Rose

A rose is a woody perennial of the genus Rosa, within the family Rosaceae. There are over 100 species. They form a group of plants that can be erect shrubs, climbing or trailing with stems that are often armed with sharp prickles. Flowers vary in size and shape and are usually large and showy, in colours ranging from white through yellows and reds. Most species are native to Asia, with smaller numbers native to Europe, North America, and northwest Africa. Species, cultivars and hybrids are all widely grown for their beauty and often are fragrant. Rose plants range in size from compact, miniature roses, to climbers that can reach 7 meters in height. Different species hybridize easily, and this has been used in the development of the wide range of garden roses.

The name rose comes from French, itself from Latin rosa, which was perhaps borrowed from Oscan, from Greek ρόδον rhodon (Aeolic βρόδον wrodon), related to Old Persian wrd-, Avestan varəda, Sogdian ward, Parthian wâr, Armenian vard.

Read more about Rose:  Botany, Uses, Pests and Diseases

Famous quotes containing the word rose:

    ‘But where can we draw water,’
    Said Pearse to Connolly,
    ‘When all the wells are parched away?
    O plain as plain can be
    There’s nothing but our own red blood
    Can make a right Rose Tree.’
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    When the rose reigns, and locks with ointments shine,
    Let rigid Cato read these lines of mine.
    Robert Herrick (1591–1674)

    The red rose whispers of passion,
    And the white rose breathes of love;
    O, the red rose is a falcon,
    And the white rose is a dove.
    John Boyle O’Reilly (1844–1890)