Deal

Deal may refer to:

Common meanings
  • A contract
  • The distribution of cards to the players of a card game
Places
  • Deal, Kent, England, a town
  • Deal, New Jersey, United States, a borough
  • Deal Lake, New Jersey
  • Deal Island (Tasmania)
  • Deal, a village in Câlnic Commune, Alba County, Romania
As a surname
  • Borden Deal (1922–1985), American novelist and short story writer
  • Charlie Deal (1891-1979), Major League Baseball player
  • Cot Deal (born 1923), Major League Baseball pitcher and coach
  • Kelley Deal (born 1961), American musician
  • Kim Deal (born 1961), American singer, guitarist and bassist; identical twin sister of Kelley Deal
  • Lance Deal (born 1961), American hammer thrower and 1996 Olympic silver medalist
  • Nathan Deal (born 1942), American politician and Governor of Georgia
In film and television
  • Deal (1978 film), a documentary film
  • Deal (2008 film), about poker
  • Deal (2009 film), directed by Michael Corrente
  • Deal (Greek game show)
  • Deal (TV pilot), a 2005 NBC pilot episode
In music
  • "Deal" (song), by Tom T. Hall
  • "Deal", a song from Jerry Garcia's 1972 album Garcia
Other
  • Deal (automobile), built in Jonesville, Michigan, from 1905 to 1911
  • Deal meteorite of 1829, fell in New Jersey, United States (see meteorite falls)
  • Deals, an American dollar store chain
  • The loss of separation (air traffic control) between aircraft
  • DEAL (Data Encryption Algorithm with Larger blocks), in cryptography

Famous quotes containing the word deal:

    I knew that the wall was the main thing in Quebec, and had cost a great deal of money.... In fact, these are the only remarkable walls we have in North America, though we have a good deal of Virginia fence, it is true.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I never understood exactly why people get engaged—The only time I ever did the most disastrous things happened—but I feel that there’s a great deal to be said for immediate matrimony always. If I once got started I’d probably have to become a mormon to cover my confusion. What I mean is that if he and she are crazy about each other it is sheer tempting God to stay apart, come what may. And if people arent crazy about each other being engaged wont help them.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)

    Though Americans talk a good deal about the virtue of being serious, they generally prefer people who are solemn over people who are serious. In politics, the rare candidate who is serious, like Adlai Stevenson, is easily overwhelmed by one who is solemn, like General Eisenhower. This is probably because it is hard for most people to recognize seriousness, which is rare, especially in politics, but comfortable to endorse solemnity, which is as commonplace as jogging.
    Russell Baker (b. 1925)