Deal

Deal may refer to:

Common meanings
  • A contract
  • The distribution of cards to the players of a card game
Places
  • Deal, Kent, England, a town
  • Deal, New Jersey, United States, a borough
  • Deal Lake, New Jersey
  • Deal Island (Tasmania)
  • Deal, a village in Câlnic Commune, Alba County, Romania
As a surname
  • Borden Deal (1922–1985), American novelist and short story writer
  • Charlie Deal (1891-1979), Major League Baseball player
  • Cot Deal (born 1923), Major League Baseball pitcher and coach
  • Kelley Deal (born 1961), American musician
  • Kim Deal (born 1961), American singer, guitarist and bassist; identical twin sister of Kelley Deal
  • Lance Deal (born 1961), American hammer thrower and 1996 Olympic silver medalist
  • Nathan Deal (born 1942), American politician and Governor of Georgia
In film and television
  • Deal (1978 film), a documentary film
  • Deal (2008 film), about poker
  • Deal (2009 film), directed by Michael Corrente
  • Deal (Greek game show)
  • Deal (TV pilot), a 2005 NBC pilot episode
In music
  • "Deal" (song), by Tom T. Hall
  • "Deal", a song from Jerry Garcia's 1972 album Garcia
Other
  • Deal (automobile), built in Jonesville, Michigan, from 1905 to 1911
  • Deal meteorite of 1829, fell in New Jersey, United States (see meteorite falls)
  • Deals, an American dollar store chain
  • The loss of separation (air traffic control) between aircraft
  • DEAL (Data Encryption Algorithm with Larger blocks), in cryptography

Famous quotes containing the word deal:

    I have done a great deal of work, as much as a man, but did not get so much pay. I used to work in the field and bind grain, keeping up with the cradler; but men doing no more, got twice as much pay.... We do as much, we eat as much, we want as much.
    Sojourner Truth (1797–1883)

    A man’s ignorance sometimes is not only useful, but beautiful,Mwhile his knowledge, so called, is oftentimes worse than useless, besides being ugly. Which is the best man to deal with,Mhe who knows nothing about a subject, and, what is extremely rare, knows that he knows nothing, or he who really knows something about it, but thinks that he knows all?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Our basic ideas about how to parent are encrusted with deeply felt emotions and many myths. One of the myths of parenting is that it is always fun and games, joy and delight. Everyone who has been a parent will testify that it is also anxiety, strife, frustration, and even hostility. Thus most major parenting- education formats deal with parental emotions and attitudes and, to a greater or lesser extent, advocate that the emotional component is more important than the knowledge.
    Bettye M. Caldwell (20th century)