Early

Early may refer to:

History

  • the beginning or oldest part of a defined historical period, as opposed to middle or late periods
    • e.g., Early modern Europe

Places:

  • In the United States:
    • Early, Iowa
    • Early, Texas
    • Early County, Georgia

People:

  • Gerald Early, writer, culture critic and professor
  • James M. Early, electrical engineer for whom the Early effect was named
  • Joseph Early, congressman from Massachusetts
  • Jubal Anderson Early, American Civil War general
  • Early Doucet, American football wide receiver for the Arizona Cardinals
  • Early Wynn, Major League baseball pitcher, elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972

Popular culture:

  • Early Cuyler, an anthropomorphic hillbilly squid in The Squidbillies.
  • Early Grayce, a sociopath in the film Kalifornia.
  • Jubal Early a fictional bounty hunter from the television series Firefly

Other uses:

  • Early Christianity
  • Early Records, a record label
  • Early effect, an effect in transistor physics

Famous quotes containing the word early:

    Today’s pressures on middle-class children to grow up fast begin in early childhood. Chief among them is the pressure for early intellectual attainment, deriving from a changed perception of precocity. Several decades ago precocity was looked upon with great suspicion. The child prodigy, it was thought, turned out to be a neurotic adult; thus the phrase “early ripe, early rot!”
    David Elkind (20th century)

    The Americans never use the word peasant, because they have no idea of the class which that term denotes; the ignorance of more remote ages, the simplicity of rural life, and the rusticity of the villager have not been preserved among them; and they are alike unacquainted with the virtues, the vices, the coarse habits, and the simple graces of an early stage of civilization.
    Alexis de Tocqueville (1805–1859)

    I doubt that I would have taken so many leaps in my own writing or been as clear about my feminist and political commitments if I had not been anointed as early as I was. Some major form of recognition seems to have to mark a woman’s career for her to be able to go out on a limb without having her credentials questioned.
    Ruth Behar (b. 1956)