Emotion

In psychology, philosophy, and their many subsets, emotion is the generic term for subjective, conscious experience that is characterized primarily by psychophysiological expressions, biological reactions, and mental states. Emotion is often associated and considered reciprocally influential with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation, as well as influenced by hormones and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, oxytocin and cortisol. Emotion is often the driving force behind motivation, positive or negative. The physiology of emotion is closely linked to arousal of the nervous system with various states and strengths of arousal relating, apparently, to particular emotions. Although those acting primarily on emotion may seem as if they are not thinking, cognition is an important aspect of emotion, particularly the interpretation of events. For example, the experience of fear usually occurs in response to a threat. The cognition of danger and subsequent arousal of the nervous system (e.g. rapid heartbeat and breathing, sweating, muscle tension) is an integral component to the subsequent interpretation and labeling of that arousal as an emotional state. Emotion is also linked to behavioral tendency. Research on emotion has increased significantly over the past two decades with many fields contributing including psychology, neuroscience, medicine, sociology, and even computer science. The numerous theories that attempt to explain the origin, neurobiology, experience, and function of emotions have only fostered more intense research on this topic.

Read more about Emotion:  Etymology, Definitions, and Differentiation, Components of Emotion, Classification, The Neurocircuitry of Emotion, Disciplinary Approaches, Notable Theorists

Other articles related to "emotion, emotions":

Last Train To Paris - Conception
... with MTV News Diddy said "One of the things trying to represent is emotion.. ... Not being afraid to show emotion on record ... are gonna be about love, feelings and emotion ...
Corumination - Therapy
... Co-rumination treatment typically consists of cognitive emotion regulation therapy for rumination with the patient ... For women, accepting a negative event/emotion and re-framing it in a positive light was associated with decreased levels of worry ... In other words, some of the cognitive emotion regulation strategies that work for men do not necessarily work for women and vice versa ...
Emotion - Notable Theorists
... a hypothesis on the origin and nature of emotions ... Emotions, then, are feelings which come about as a result of these physiological changes, rather than being their cause ... The Affect theory introduced the concept of basic emotions, and was based on the idea that the dominance of the emotion, which he called the affect system, was ...
Autobiographical Memory - Emotion - Negative
... While it seems adaptive to have negative memories fade faster, sometimes it may not be the case ... Remembering negative events can prevent us from acting overconfident or repeating the same mistake, and we can learn from them in order to make better decisions in the future ...
Carroll Izard - Representative Publications
... "Accelerating the development of emotion competence in Head Start children Effects on adaptive and maladaptive behavior" ... "Kindergarten children's emotion competence as a predictor of their academic competence in first grade" ... Emotion 7 (1) 77–88 ...

Famous quotes containing the word emotion:

    For public opinion does not admit that lofty rapturous laughter is worthy to stand beside lofty lyrical emotion and that there is all the difference in the world between it and the antics of a clown at a fair.
    Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol (1809–1852)

    Beauty ought to look a little surprised: it is the emotion that best suits her face.... The beauty who does not look surprised, who accepts her position as her due—she reminds us too much of a prima donna.
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)

    When the wind carries a cry which is meaningful to human ears, it is simpler to believe the wind shares with us some part of the emotion of Being than that the mysteries of a hurricane’s rising murmur reduce to no more than the random collision of insensate molecules.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)