Who is Marcus Tullius Cicero?

  • (noun): A Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC).
    Synonyms: Cicero, Tully

Some articles on tullius cicero, marcus tullius cicero, marcus, cicero, tullius, marcus tullius:

Quintus Tullius Cicero
... Quintus Tullius Cicero (102 BC – 43 BC) was the younger brother of the celebrated orator, philosopher and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero ...
Titus Pullo (Rome Character) - Character History
... withheld there by Servilia of the Junii, his lover and the mother of Marcus Junius Brutus ... Pullo kills Marcus Tullius Cicero himself ... The two men have a strangely civil and amiable conversation before Cicero allows Pullo to kill him ...
Pro Tullio
... Pro Tullio (Latin for "On behalf of Tullius") is a partially preserved speech delivered by the Roman orator Cicero in 72 or 71 BC ... The speech was made on behalf of Cicero's client, Marcus Tullius, who claimed legal damages from his neighbor, Publius Fabius, on the basis that Fabius had ...
Tullius
... Tullius was a Roman nomen ... Tully, especially as another name for Cicero, is an anglicized form now considered antiquated ... nomen are related by blood Cicero himself did not believe that he was descended from Servius Tullius, though at one point he referred to their shared gens ...
Political Career Of Marcus Tullius Cicero
... The Political career of Marcus Tullius Cicero began in 75 BC when Marcus Tullius Cicero was elected to political office, and ended in 43 BC, when he was assassinated upon the orders of Mark Antony ... Cicero, a Roman statesman, lawyer, political theorist, philosopher, and Roman constitutionalist, reached the height of Roman power, the Consulship, and played a critical role in the ... A contemporary of Julius Caesar, Cicero is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists ...

Famous quotes containing the words marcus tullius cicero, marcus tullius, tullius cicero, cicero, marcus and/or tullius:

    What is impossible by the nature of things is not confirmed by any law.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    The long time to come when I shall not exist has more effect on me than this short present time, which nevertheless seems endless.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    What times! What manners! The Senate knows these things, the consul sees them, and yet this man lives.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    Nature has planted in our minds an insatiable longing to see the truth.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    We fight our way through the massed and leveled collective safe taste of the Top 40, just looking for a little something we can call our own. But when we find it and jam the radio to hear it again it isn’t just ours—it is a link to thousands of others who are sharing it with us. As a matter of a single song this might mean very little; as culture, as a way of life, you can’t beat it.
    —Greil Marcus (b. 1945)

    No obligation to do the impossible is binding.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)