Who is Marcus Tullius Cicero?

  • (noun): A Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC).
    Synonyms: Cicero, Tully

Some articles on marcus, marcus tullius cicero, cicero, tullius, tullius cicero, marcus tullius:

Titus Pullo (Rome Character) - Character History
... the Junii, his lover and the mother of Marcus Junius Brutus ... Pullo kills Marcus Tullius Cicero himself ... two men have a strangely civil and amiable conversation before Cicero allows Pullo to kill him ...
Tullius
... Tullius was a Roman nomen ... Tully, especially as another name for Cicero, is an anglicized form now considered antiquated ... nomen are related by blood Cicero himself did not believe that he was descended from Servius Tullius, though at one point he referred to their shared gens ...
Quintus Tullius Cicero
... Quintus Tullius Cicero (102 BC – 43 BC) was the younger brother of the celebrated orator, philosopher and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero ...
Pro Tullio
... Pro Tullio (Latin for "On behalf of Tullius") is a partially preserved speech delivered by the Roman orator Cicero in 72 or 71 BC ... The speech was made on behalf of Cicero's client, Marcus Tullius, who claimed legal damages from his neighbor, Publius Fabius, on the basis that Fabius had ...
Political Career Of Marcus Tullius Cicero
... The Political career of Marcus Tullius Cicero began in 75 BC when Marcus Tullius Cicero was elected to political office, and ended in 43 BC, when he was assassinated upon the orders of Mark Antony ... Cicero, a Roman statesman, lawyer, political theorist, philosopher, and Roman constitutionalist, reached the height of Roman power, the Consulship, and played a critical role in the transformation of the ... A contemporary of Julius Caesar, Cicero is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists ...

Famous quotes containing the words marcus tullius cicero, marcus tullius, tullius cicero, cicero and/or tullius:

    In time of war the laws are silent.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    The study and knowledge of the universe would somehow be lame and defective were no practical results to follow.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    Justice consists in doing no injury to men; decency in giving them no offence.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    For a courageous man cannot die dishonorably, a man who has attained the consulship cannot die before his time, a philosopher cannot die wretchedly.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    If I err in belief that the souls of men are immortal, I gladly err, nor do I wish this error which gives me pleasure to be wrested from me while I live.
    —Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)