Size

The word size may refer to how big or small something is. In particular:

  • Measurement, the process or the result of determining the magnitude of a quantity, such as length or mass, relative to a unit of measurement, such as a meter or a kilogram
  • Dimensions, including length, width, height, diameter, perimeter, area, volume
  • Clothing sizes such as shoe size
  • Body dimensions (Anthropometry)
    • Human height, the distance from the bottom of the feet to the top of the head in a human body standing erect
    • Human weight
  • In statistics (hypothesis testing), the size of the test refers to the rate of false positives, denoted by α
  • In computing, file size
  • size (Unix), a command-line Unix tool
  • Magnitude (mathematics), magnitude or size of a mathematical object
  • Magnitude of brightness or intensity of a star or an earthquake as measured on a logarithmic scale
  • In mathematics there are, in addition to the dimensions mentioned above (equal if there is an isometry), various other concepts of size for sets:
    • measure (mathematics), a systematic way to assign to each suitable subset a number
    • cardinality (equal if there is a bijection), of a set is a measure of the "number of elements of the set"
    • for well-ordered sets: ordinal number (equal if there is an order-isomorphism)
  • Resizing (fiction), a theme in fiction, in particular in fairy tales, fantasy, and science fiction
  • Sizing, or size, a filler or glaze
  • Demonstrating Size (dimension)

Famous quotes containing the word size:

    Beauty depends on size as well as symmetry. No very small animal can be beautiful, for looking at it takes so small a portion of time that the impression of it will be confused. Nor can any very large one, for a whole view of it cannot be had at once, and so there will be no unity and completeness.
    Aristotle (384 B.C.–322 B.C.)

    Delusions that shrink to the size of a woman’s glove,
    Then sicken inclusively outwards:
    . . . the incessant recital
    Intoned by reality, larded with technical terms,
    Each one double-yolked with meaning and meaning’s rebuttal:
    For the skirl of that bulletin unpicks the world like a knot....
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)