Size

The word size may refer to how big or small something is. In particular:

  • Measurement, the process or the result of determining the magnitude of a quantity, such as length or mass, relative to a unit of measurement, such as a meter or a kilogram
  • Dimensions, including length, width, height, diameter, perimeter, area, volume
  • Clothing sizes such as shoe size
  • Body dimensions (Anthropometry)
    • Human height, the distance from the bottom of the feet to the top of the head in a human body standing erect
    • Human weight
  • In statistics (hypothesis testing), the size of the test refers to the rate of false positives, denoted by α
  • In computing, file size
  • size (Unix), a command-line Unix tool
  • Magnitude (mathematics), magnitude or size of a mathematical object
  • Magnitude of brightness or intensity of a star or an earthquake as measured on a logarithmic scale
  • In mathematics there are, in addition to the dimensions mentioned above (equal if there is an isometry), various other concepts of size for sets:
    • measure (mathematics), a systematic way to assign to each suitable subset a number
    • cardinality (equal if there is a bijection), of a set is a measure of the "number of elements of the set"
    • for well-ordered sets: ordinal number (equal if there is an order-isomorphism)
  • Resizing (fiction), a theme in fiction, in particular in fairy tales, fantasy, and science fiction
  • Sizing, or size, a filler or glaze
  • Demonstrating Size (dimension)

Famous quotes containing the word size:

    Crotchless trouser allows wearer to show private parts in public. Neoprene-coated nylon pack cloth is stain resistant, water repellent and tickles thighs when walking. Tan-olive shade goes with most fetishes. Adjustable straps attach to belt for good fit and easy up-down. Pant is suitable for fast exposures as well as extended engagements. One size fits all.
    Alfred Gingold, U.S. humorist. Items From Our Catalogue, “Flasher’s Pants,” Avon Books (1982)

    There are obvious places in which government can narrow the chasm between haves and have-nots. One is the public schools, which have been seen as the great leveler, the authentic melting pot. That, today, is nonsense. In his scathing study of the nation’s public school system entitled “Savage Inequalities,” Jonathan Kozol made manifest the truth: that we have a system that discriminates against the poor in everything from class size to curriculum.
    Anna Quindlen (b. 1952)

    Learn to shrink yourself to the size of the company you are in. Take their tone, whatever it may be, and excell in it if you can; but never pretend to give the tone. A free conversation will no more bear a dictator than a free government will.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)