Weight

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is the force on the object due to gravity. Its magnitude (a scalar quantity), often denoted by an italic letter W, is the product of the mass m of the object and the magnitude of the local gravitational acceleration g; thus: W = mg. When considered a vector, weight is often denoted by a bold letter W. The unit of measurement for weight is that of force, which in the International System of Units (SI) is the newton. For example, an object with a mass of one kilogram has a weight of about 9.8 newtons on the surface of the Earth, about one-sixth as much on the Moon, and zero when in deep space far away from all bodies imparting gravitational influence.

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Famous quotes containing the word weight:

    You will trail across the rocks
    and wash them with your salt,
    you will curl between sand-hills
    you will thunder along the cliff
    break retreat get fresh strength
    gather and pour weight upon the beach.
    Hilda Doolittle (1886–1961)

    Europe has lived on its contradictions, flourished on its differences, and, constantly transcending itself thereby, has created a civilization on which the whole world depends even when rejecting it. This is why I do not believe in a Europe unified under the weight of an ideology or of a technocracy that overlooked these differences.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    A false balance is abomination to the Lord: but a just weight is his delight.
    Bible: Hebrew Proverbs 11:1.