List of Equations in Classical Mechanics

List Of Equations In Classical Mechanics

Classical mechanics is the branch of physics used to describe the motion of macroscopic objects. It is the most familiar of the theories of physics. The concepts it covers, such as mass, acceleration, and force, are commonly used and known. The subject is based upon a three-dimensional Euclidean space with fixed axes, called a frame of reference. The point of concurrency of the three axes is known as the origin of the particular space.

Classical mechanics utilises many equations—as well as other mathematical concepts—which relate various physical quantities to one another. These include differential equations, manifolds, Lie groups, and ergodic theory. This page gives a summary of the most important of these.

This article lists equations from Newtonian mechanics, see analytical mechanics for the more general formulation of classical mechanics (which includes Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics).

Read more about List Of Equations In Classical Mechanics:  Kinematics, Dynamics, Energy, Euler's Equations For Rigid Body Dynamics, General Planar Motion, Equations of Motion (constant Acceleration), Galilean Frame Transforms, Mechanical Oscillators

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