Who is johann wolfgang von goethe?

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (, 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer, artist, and politician. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, and over 10,000 letters written by him are extant, as are nearly 3,000 drawings.

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    Translators can be considered as busy matchmakers who praise as extremely desirable a half-veiled beauty. They arouse an irresistible yearning for the original.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    When translating one must proceed up to the intranslatable; only then one becomes aware of the foreign nation and the foreign tongue.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    It is a maxim of wise government to treat people not as they should be but as they actually are.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    The eye doesn’t see any shapes, it sees only what is differentiated through light and dark or through colors.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    One must not criticize that which is common since it remains always the same.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Music is either sacred or secular. The sacred agrees with its dignity, and here has its greatest effect on life, an effect that remains the same through all ages and epochs. Secular music should be cheerful throughout.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Man ... knows only when he is satisfied and when he suffers, and only his sufferings and his satisfactions instruct him concerning himself, teach him what to seek and what to avoid. For the rest, man is a confused creature; he knows not whence he comes or whither he goes, he knows little of the world, and above all, he knows little of himself.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)