Who is johann wolfgang von goethe?

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (, 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer, artist, and politician. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, and over 10,000 letters written by him are extant, as are nearly 3,000 drawings.

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    The dignity of art probably appears most eminently with music since it does not have any material that needs to be discounted. Music is all form and content and elevates and ennobles everything that it expresses.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    How can one learn to know oneself? Never by introspection, rather by action. Try to do your duty, and you will know right away what you are like.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    By the artist’s seizing any one object from nature, that object no longer is part of nature. One can go so far as to say that the artist creates the object in that very moment by emphasizing its significant, characteristic, and interesting aspects or, rather, by adding the higher values.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    National literature does not mean much these days; now is the age of world literature, and every one must contribute to hasten the arrival of that age.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    The most passionate, consistent, extreme and implacable enemy of the Enlightenment and ... all forms of rationalism ... was Johann Georg Hamann. His influence, direct and indirect, upon the romantic revolt against universalism and scientific method ... was considerable and perhaps crucial.
    Isaiah Berlin (b. 1909)

    Certain books seem to have been written not for the purpose that we learn something from them but that we know that the author was a knowledgeable person.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    By the artist’s seizing any one object from nature, that object no longer is part of nature. One can go so far as to say that the artist creates the object in that very moment by emphasizing its significant, characteristic, and interesting aspects or, rather, by adding the higher values.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    I come more and more to the conclusion that one must take the side of the minority which is always the more intelligent one.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)