BET

BET can refer to:

  • Black Entertainment Television, a U.S. cable television station targeted to an African-American demographic
  • BET theory, an adsorption model for gases named after physicists Brunauer, Emmett and Teller
  • Blade element theory to determine the behaviour of propellers
  • British Electric Traction, a British industrial conglomerate
  • Borkou-Ennedi-Tibesti (disambiguation), administrative subdivisions of Chad
  • BET-10, Bucharest Exchange Trading index
  • Biotechnia Ellinikon Trikyklon, a Greek vehicle manufacturer that ceased production in 1975
  • Basic Economics Test (BET), a standardized test of economics
  • Bethel Airport in Bethel, Alaska (IATA Code: BET)
  • See Essential tremor for Benign essential tremor

Famous quotes containing the word bet:

    Christina Bailey: I was just thinking how much you can tell about a person from such simple things. Your car, for instance.
    Mike Hammer: Now what kind of message does it send you?
    Christina: You have only one real, lasting love.
    Mike: Now who could that be?
    Christina: You. You’re one of those self-indulgent males who thinks about nothing but his clothes, his car, himself. I’ll bet you do push-ups every morning just to keep your belly hard.
    —A.I. (Albert Isaac)

    Roger Thornhill: Tell me, how does a girl like you get to be a girl like you?
    Eve Kendall: Lucky I guess.
    Roger Thornhill: No, not lucky. Naughty, wicked, up to no good. Ever kill anyone? Because I bet you could tease a man to death without half trying. So stop trying.
    Ernest Lehman (b.1920)

    While we were thus engaged in the twilight, we heard faintly, from far down the stream, what sounded like two strokes of a woodchopper’s axe, echoing dully through the grim solitude.... When we told Joe of this, he exclaimed, “By George, I’ll bet that was a moose! They make a noise like that.” These sounds affected us strangely, and by their very resemblance to a familiar one, where they probably had so different an origin, enhanced the impression of solitude and wildness.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)