Answer

Generally, an answer is a reply to a question or is a solution, a retaliation, or a response that is relevant to the said question.

In law, an answer was originally a solemn assertion in opposition to someone or something, and thus generally any counter-statement or defense, a reply to a question or response, or objection, or a correct solution of a problem.

In the common law, an answer is the first pleading by a defendant, usually filed and served upon the plaintiff within a certain strict time limit after a civil complaint or criminal information or indictment has been served upon the defendant. It may have been preceded by an optional "pre-answer" motion to dismiss or demurrer; if such a motion is unsuccessful, the defendant must file an answer to the complaint or risk an adverse default judgment.

In a criminal case, there is usually an arraignment or some other kind of appearance before the defendant comes to court. The pleading in the criminal case, which is entered on the record in open court, is usually either guilty or not guilty. Generally speaking in private, civil cases there is no plea entered of guilt or innocence. There is only a judgment that grants money damages or some other kind of equitable remedy such as restitution or a permanent injunction. Criminal cases may lead to fines or other punishment, such as imprisonment.

The famous Latin Responsa Prudentium ("answers of the learned ones") were the accumulated views of many successive generations of Roman lawyers, a body of legal opinion which gradually became authoritative.

In music an "answer" (also known as countersubject) is the technical name in counterpoint for the repetition or modification by one part or instrument of a theme proposed by another.

Other articles related to "answer, answers":

Tim Janus - Game Show Appearances
... in 2009, winning $100,000 before choosing to walk away, although he had surmised the correct answer to the $250,000 question ... earning contestants from the season's first 45 shows will return for a chance to answer a million dollar question, and Janus qualified as the fifth seed for the Million Dollar Prize ... He returned on November 16 to answer his Million Dollar Question ...
Error-correcting Codes With Feedback - History
... the Bar-Kochba game (also known as Twenty questions), with a given percentage of wrong answers, and calculated the minimum number of randomly chosen questions to determine the answer ... given message was in this subset, a 'yes' or 'no' answer ... Based on this answer, the receiver then chose a new subset and repeated the process ...
Hollywood's Talking - Gameplay - Short Subjects
... Unlike the main game, there was no penalty for an incorrect answer, and contestants could buzz-in and answer as much as they wanted on each clip ... Each correct answer won the same amount of money won in the main game (there was no penalty for an incorrect answer), and solving five subjects won an extra $1,000 ...
Number Sense (UIL) - Rules and Scoring
... stop writing (they are not allowed to finish incomplete answers started before the stop signal) ... The questions must be answered in order a skipped question is scored as a wrong answer ... In order for a question to be scored as correct the exact answer must be given (no allowance for rounding), except where the question is preceded by an asterisk, in which case for the question to be ...
RE (complexity)
... is the class of decision problems for which a 'yes' answer can be verified by a Turing machine in a finite amount of time ... Informally, it means that if the answer is 'yes', then there is some procedure which takes finite time to determine this ... On the other hand, if the answer is 'no', the machine might never halt ...

Famous quotes containing the word answer:

    The secret of heaven is kept from age to age. No imprudent, no sociable angel ever dropt an early syllable to answer the longings of saints, the fears of mortals. We should have listened on our knees to any favorite, who, by stricter obedience, had brought his thoughts into parallelism with the celestial currents, and could hint to human ears the scenery and circumstance of the newly parted soul.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Inspector Clouseau: How can a blind man be a lookout?
    Chief Inspector Dreyfus: How can an idiot be a policeman? Answer me that!
    Inspector Clouseau: It’s very simple. All he has to do is enlist.
    Blake Edwards (b. 1922)

    The most fitting monuments this nation can build are schoolhouses and homes for those who do the work of the world. It is no answer to say that they are accustomed to rags and hunger. In this world of plenty every human being has a right to food, clothes, decent shelter, and the rudiments of education.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902)