Who is Susan Sontag?

  • (noun): United States writer (born in 1933).
    Synonyms: Sontag

Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag (/ˈsɒntɑːɡ/; January 16, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was an American writer and filmmaker, literary icon, and political activist. Beginning with the publication of her 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'" Sontag became a lifelong international cultural and intellectual celebrity. Sontag was often photographed and her image became widely recognized even in mainstream society. Her works include On Photography, Against Interpretation, The Way We Live Now, and Regarding the Pain of Others.

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Some articles on Susan Sontag:

William Drenttel - Other Professional and Non-profit Affiliations (1997-2011) - Susan Sontag Literary Foundation
... Drenttel has served as vice president of the Susan Sontag Literary Foundation since 2007 ... the international exchange of language and culture in the spirit of Susan Sontag’s lifetime commitment to young artistic voices ...
Susan Sontag - Awards and Honors
... Bosnia." An initiative by Sarajevo Mayor Muhidin Hamamdzic to pay tribute to Susan Sontag, who has died recently, by renaming Theatre Square outside the National Theatre Susan ... Theater in Sarajevo will get the name of Susan Sontag ... a plate with a new street name for Theater Square Theater Square of Susan Sontag ...

Famous quotes containing the words susan sontag, sontag and/or susan:

    Photographs may be more memorable than moving images because they are a neat slice of time, not a flow. Television is a stream of underselected images, each of which cancels its predecessor. Each still photograph is a privileged moment, turned into a slim object that one can keep and look at again.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    Cogito ergo boom.
    —Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    Can you conceive what it is to native-born American women citizens, accustomed to the advantages of our schools, our churches and the mingling of our social life, to ask over and over again for so simple a thing as that “we, the people,” should mean women as well as men; that our Constitution should mean exactly what it says?
    Mary F. Eastman, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4 ch. 5, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)