Who is Susan Sontag?

  • (noun): United States writer (born in 1933).
    Synonyms: Sontag

Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag (/ˈsɒntɑːɡ/; January 16, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was an American writer and filmmaker, literary icon, and political activist. Beginning with the publication of her 1964 essay "Notes on 'Camp'" Sontag became a lifelong international cultural and intellectual celebrity. Sontag was often photographed and her image became widely recognized even in mainstream society. Her works include On Photography, Against Interpretation, The Way We Live Now, and Regarding the Pain of Others.

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Some articles on Susan Sontag:

Susan Sontag - Awards and Honors
... and Bosnia." An initiative by Sarajevo Mayor Muhidin Hamamdzic to pay tribute to Susan Sontag, who has died recently, by renaming Theatre Square outside the National Theatre Susan Sontag Theatre Square, was ... Theater in Sarajevo will get the name of Susan Sontag ... with a new street name for Theater Square Theater Square of Susan Sontag ...
William Drenttel - Other Professional and Non-profit Affiliations (1997-2011) - Susan Sontag Literary Foundation
... Drenttel has served as vice president of the Susan Sontag Literary Foundation since 2007 ... exchange of language and culture in the spirit of Susan Sontag’s lifetime commitment to young artistic voices ...

Famous quotes containing the words susan sontag, sontag and/or susan:

    Any important disease whose causality is murky, and for which treatment is ineffectual, tends to be awash in significance.
    Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    To me, literature is a calling, even a kind of salvation. It connects me with an enterprise that is over 2,000 years old. What do we have from the past? Art and thought. That’s what lasts. That’s what continues to feed people and given them an idea of something better. A better state of one’s feelings or simply the idea of a silence in one’s self that allows one to think or to feel. Which to me is the same.
    —Susan Sontag (b. 1933)

    The thanksgiving of the old Jew, “Lord, I thank Thee that Thou didst not make me a woman,” doubtless came from a careful review of the situation. Like all of us, he had fortitude enough to bear his neighbors’ afflictions.
    Frances A. Griffin, U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 19, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902)