Vice President of Costa Rica - Vice Presidents of The Governing Committees of Costa Rica (1821- 1824)

Vice Presidents of The Governing Committees of Costa Rica (1821- 1824)

Between 1821 and 1824 Costa Rica was governed through a system of Governing Committees who chose from among their members a President and a Vice-President.

Name Title Time in Office Notes
Nicolás Carillo y Aguirre Vice-President of the Interim Governing Committee 1821–1822
José Maria de Peralta y La Vega Vice-President of the High Governing Committee 1822–1823 Acted as interim president on some occasions
José Francisco Madriz Vice-President of the High Governing Committee 1 January-20 March 1823
Santiago de Bonilla y Laya-Bolívar Vice-President of the Provincial Constitutional Congress 16–30 April 1823 Acted as interim President for some sessions
Manuel García-Escalante Interim Vice-President of the Provincial Constitutional Congress 30 April-6 May 1823 Acted as interim President for some sessions
Santiago de Bonilla y Laya-Bolívar Vice-President of the Provincial Constitutional Congress 6–10 May 1823
Eusebio Rodríguez y Castro Vice-President of the High Governing Committee 1823–1824
Alejo Aguilar Vice-President of the High Governing Committee 8 January-12 February 1824
Eusebio Rodríguez y Castro Vice-President of the High Governing Committee 12 February-8 September 1824

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