Talent

Talent can refer to:

  • Talent (measurement)
  • Aptitude, a talent is a group of aptitudes useful for some activity, talents may refer to aptitudes themselves
Entertainment
  • A show-business personality or group of them
    • Talent agent, a person who finds jobs for actors, musicians, models, and other people in various entertainment businesses
    • Talent manager (or personal manager), one who guides the career of artists in the entertainment business
    • Talent scout, responsible for finding and developing talent
    • Talent show, a live performance spectacle (sometimes on TV) where contestants perform acting, singing, dancing, acrobatics and other art forms
    • Tarento, the Japanese pronunciation of the word, a Japanese show-business personality
  • The Got Talent series of television shows, in several national versions
  • Talent, a 1978 play by Victoria Wood
  • Talent (comics), a comic book series written by Christopher Golden and Tom Sngoski, drawn by Paul Azaceta.
  • The Talent series of books by Anne McCaffrey:
  • Talent Series, a series of books written by Zoey Dean
    • Talent, the first novel in that series.
  • Young Talent Time (1971-1989), an Australian television variety program on Network Ten
People
  • Billy Talent, a Canadian rock group from Toronto
  • Jim Talent (born 1956), American politician, former Senator from Missouri.
Other
  • Talent (artwork), a seminal work of art by David Robbins
  • Talent management - the recruitment and management of talented workers
  • Talent Zoo (or TalentZoo.com), a recruitment company and job search engine specializing in the communications industry, including the advertising, marketing, public relations, broadcasting, and publishing sectors
  • Talent (measurement), an ancient unit of mass and value
    • Attic talent ancient Greek coin
  • Bombardier Talent, a type of multiple unit passenger train manufactured by Bombardier

Famous quotes containing the word talent:

    “Letting go” ...implies generosity, a talent a good mother needs in abundance. Separation is not loss, it is not cutting yourself off from someone you love. It is giving freedom to the other person to be herself before she becomes resentful, stunted, and suffocated by being tied too close. Separation is not the end of love. It creates love.
    Nancy Friday (20th century)

    Language was not powerful enough to describe the infant phenomenon. “I’ll tell you what, sir,” he said; “the talent of this child is not to be imagined. She must be seen, sir—seen—to be ever so faintly appreciated.”... The infant phenomenon, though of short stature, had a comparatively aged countenance, and had moreover been precisely the same age—not perhaps to the full extent of the memory of the oldest inhabitant, but certainly for five good years.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    Elvis transcends his talent to the point of dispensing with it altogether.
    Greil Marcus (b. 1945)