Result

A result (also called upshot) is the final consequence of a sequence of actions or events expressed qualitatively or quantitatively. Possible results include advantage, disadvantage, gain, injury, loss, value and victory. There may be a range of possible outcomes associated with an event depending on the point of view, historical distance or relevance. Reaching no result can mean that actions are inefficient, ineffective, meaningless or flawed.

Some types of result are as follows:

  • in general, the outcome of any kind of research, action or phenomenon
  • in games (e.g. cricket, lotteries) or wars, the result includes the identity of the victorious party and possibly the effects on the environment
  • in mathematics, the final value of a calculation (e.g. arithmetic operation), function or statistical expression, or the final statement of a theorem that has been proven
  • in statistics, any information analyzed, extracted or interpolated from polls, tests or logs
  • in computer sciences, the return value of a function, state of a system or list of records matching a query (e.g. web search). The result type is the data type of the data returned by a function.
  • in science, the outcome of an experiment (e.g. see null hypothesis)
  • in forensics and justice, the proof of guilt or innocence of a suspect after evaluating evidence in a criminal investigation
  • in economics and accounting, the profit or loss at the end of a fiscal period.
  • in democracy, the election of a representative or the outcome of a vote on a subject

Read more about Result:  In Management

Famous quotes containing the word result:

    Most childhood problems don’t result from “bad” parenting, but are the inevitable result of the growing that parents and children do together. The point isn’t to head off these problems or find ways around them, but rather to work through them together and in doing so to develop a relationship of mutual trust to rely on when the next problem comes along.
    Fred Rogers (20th century)

    As a result of the feminist revolution, “feminine” becomes an abusive epithet.
    Percy Wyndham Lewis (1882–1957)

    That all [Berkeley’s] arguments, though otherwise intended, are, in reality, merely sceptical, appears from this, that they admit of no answer and produce no conviction. Their only effect is to cause that momentary amazement and irresolution and confusion, which is the result of scepticism.
    David Hume (1711–1776)