Kinetic Energy

The kinetic energy of an object is the energy which it possesses due to its motion. It is defined as the work needed to accelerate a body of a given mass from rest to its stated velocity. Having gained this energy during its acceleration, the body maintains this kinetic energy unless its speed changes. The same amount of work is done by the body in decelerating from its current speed to a state of rest.

In classical mechanics, the kinetic energy of a non-rotating object of mass m traveling at a speed v is ½ mv². In relativistic mechanics, this is only a good approximation when v is much less than the speed of light.

Read more about Kinetic Energy:  History and Etymology, Introduction, Relativistic Kinetic Energy of Rigid Bodies, Kinetic Energy in Quantum Mechanics

Famous quotes containing the words kinetic and/or energy:

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    Stephen Spender (1909–1995)