Operation

Operation or Operations may refer to:

  • Scientific operation
  • Surgery, or operation
  • An operation in mathematics:
    • Graph operations
    • Unary operation
    • Binary operation
    • Arity
    • Operations research
  • In language, an operation is a word which represents a function (or instruction), rather than a term or name
  • In computer science:
    • an operation is performed on the basis of an instruction
    • Modulo operation
  • In military and intelligence:
    • Military operation, a military action (usually in a military campaign) using deployed forces
    • Operations (military staff), staff involved in planning operations
    • Combined operations, operations by forces of two or more allied nations
    • Operations room, the tactical center providing processed information for command and control of an area of operations
    • Special operations, military operations that are unconventional
    • Covert operation, an operation which conceals the identity of the sponsor
    • Clandestine operation, an intelligence or military operation carried out so that the operation goes unnoticed
    • Black operation, an operation that may be outside of standard military protocol or against the law.
    • Sting operation, an operation designed to catch a person committing a crime, by means of deception
  • Business operations
    • Operations management
    • Manufacturing operations
    • Unit operation, a basic step in a chemical engineering process
  • Rail transport operations, the control of a rail system
  • Operations support system used in the telecommunications industry
  • Operation of law, a legal term that indicates that a right or liability has been created for a party
  • Anomalous operation, in parapsychology, a term describing a broad category of purported paranormal effects
  • Operation (game), a battery-operated game of physical skill

Famous quotes containing the word operation:

    It requires a surgical operation to get a joke well into a Scotch understanding. The only idea of wit, or rather that inferior variety of the electric talent which prevails occasionally in the North, and which, under the name of “Wut,” is so infinitely distressing to people of good taste, is laughing immoderately at stated intervals.
    Sydney Smith (1771–1845)

    Waiting for the race to become official, he began to feel as if he had as much effect on the final outcome of the operation as a single piece of a jumbo jigsaw puzzle has to its predetermined final design. Only the addition of the missing fragments of the puzzle would reveal if the picture was as he guessed it would be.
    Stanley Kubrick (b. 1928)

    An absolute can only be given in an intuition, while all the rest has to do with analysis. We call intuition here the sympathy by which one is transported into the interior of an object in order to coincide with what there is unique and consequently inexpressible in it. Analysis, on the contrary, is the operation which reduces the object to elements already known.
    Henri Bergson (1859–1941)