List of Years in Literature

List Of Years In Literature

This page gives a chronological list of years in literature (descending order), with notable publications listed with their respective years and a small selection of notable events. The time covered in individual years covers Renaissance, Baroque and Modern literature, while Medieval literature is resolved by century.

Note: List of years in poetry exists specifically for poetry.

See Table of years in literature for an overview of all "year in literature" pages.

History of literature
Bronze Age literature
Sumerian
Egyptian
Akkadian
Classical literatures
Chinese
Greek
Hebrew
Latin
Pahlavi
Pali
Prakrit
Sanskrit
Syriac
Tamil
Early Medieval literature
Matter of Rome
Matter of France
Matter of Britain
Byzantine literature
Kannada literature
Persian literature
Turkish
Medieval literature
Old Bulgarian
Old English
Middle English
Arabic
Byzantine
Catalan
Dutch
French
German
Indian
Old Irish
Italian
Japanese
Kannada
Nepal Bhasa
Norse
Persian
Telugu
Turkish
Welsh
Early Modern literature
Renaissance literature
Baroque literature
Modern literature
18th century
19th century
20th century
21st century

Read more about List Of Years In Literature:  Middle Ages, Ancient Times

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