Effect

Effect may refer to:

  • A result or change of something
    • List of effects
    • Cause and effect, an idiom describing causality

In pharmacy and pharmacology:

  • Drug effect, a change resulting from the administration of a drug
    • Therapeutic effect, a beneficial change in medical condition, often caused by a drug
    • Adverse effect or side effect, an unwanted change in medical condition caused by a drug
  • Dose-response effect, the relationship between a drug dose and its effect, plotted on a dose-response curve

In media:

  • Special effect, an artificial illusion
    • Sound effect, an artificially created or enhanced sound
    • Visual effects, artificially created or enhanced images
  • Audio signal processing
    • Effects unit, a device used to manipulate electronic sound
      • Effects pedal, a small device attached to an instrument to modify its sound

Miscellaneous:

  • Effects, one's personal property or belongings
  • Effects (G.I. Joe), a fictional character in the G.I. Joe universe
  • Effects (film), a 2005 film
  • Effect size, a measure of the strength of a relationship between two variables
  • Effect system, formal system which describes the computational effects of computer programs

Amendments to the constitution of the United States: (Bill of Rights) Amendment IV "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, house, papers, and effects...

Famous quotes containing the word effect:

    The want of an international Copy-Right Law, by rendering it nearly impossible to obtain anything from the booksellers in the way of remuneration for literary labor, has had the effect of forcing many of our very best writers into the service of the Magazines and Reviews.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)

    A readiness to believe ill of others, before we have duly examined it, is the effect of laziness and pride. We are eager to find a culprit, and loath to give ourselves the trouble of examining the crime.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)

    In his very rejection of art Walt Whitman is an artist. He tried to produce a certain effect by certain means and he succeeded.... He stands apart, and the chief value of his work is in its prophecy, not in its performance. He has begun a prelude to larger themes. He is the herald to a new era. As a man he is the precursor of a fresh type. He is a factor in the heroic and spiritual evolution of the human being. If Poetry has passed him by, Philosophy will take note of him.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)