Consumer Goods in The Soviet Union

Consumer Goods In The Soviet Union

The industry of the Soviet Union was usually divided into two major categories. Group A was "heavy industry," which included all goods that serve as an input required for the production of some other, final good. Group B was "Soviet consumer goods" (final goods used for consumption), including foods, clothing and shoes, housing, and such heavy-industry products as appliances and fuels that are used by individual consumers. From the early days of the Stalin era, Group A received top priority in economic planning and allocation.

Read more about Consumer Goods In The Soviet Union:  The Consumer Industry and Soviet Economic Development, The Processes and Goals of Consumer Production, Consumer Supply in The 1980s

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    If the Soviet Union let another political party come into existence, they would still be a one-party state, because everybody would join the other party.
    Ronald Reagan (b. 1911)

    The so-called consumer society and the politics of corporate capitalism have created a second nature of man which ties him libidinally and aggressively to the commodity form. The need for possessing, consuming, handling and constantly renewing the gadgets, devices, instruments, engines, offered to and imposed upon the people, for using these wares even at the danger of one’s own destruction, has become a “biological” need.
    Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979)

    those far-fet helps be such
    As do bewray a want of inward touch,
    and sure at length stolen goods do come to light.
    But if, both for your love and skill, your name
    You seek to nurse at fullest breasts of Fame,
    Stella behold, and then begin to indite.
    Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586)

    In the Soviet Union everything happens slowly. Always remember that.
    A.N. (Arkady N.)

    Let’s have the Union restored as it was, if we can; but if we can’t, I’m in favor of the Union as it wasn’t.
    Artemus Ward (1834–1867)