Comparative

In grammar, the comparative is the form of an adjective or adverb which denotes the degree or grade by which a person, thing, or other entity has a property or quality greater or less in extent than that of another, and is used in this context with a subordinating conjunction, such as than. The comparative is one of the degrees of comparison, along with the positive and the superlative.

Read more about Comparative:  Structure, Two-clause Sentences, Adverbs, Absolute Comparative

Famous quotes containing the word comparative:

    The utmost familiarity with dead streams, or with the ocean, would not prepare a man for this peculiar navigation; and the most skillful boatman anywhere else would here be obliged to take out his boat and carry round a hundred times, still with great risk, as well as delay, where the practiced batteau-man poles up with comparative ease and safety.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    That hour in the life of a man when first the help of humanity fails him, and he learns that in his obscurity and indigence humanity holds him a dog and no man: that hour is a hard one, but not the hardest. There is still another hour which follows, when he learns that in his infinite comparative minuteness and abjectness, the gods do likewise despise him, and own him not of their clan.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Our comparative fidelity was fear of defeat at the hands of another partner.
    Max Frisch (1911–1991)