Present

The present (or now) is the time that is associated with the events perceived directly and in the first time, not as a recollection (perceived more than once) or a speculation (predicted, hypothesis, uncertain). It is a period of time between the past and the future, and can vary in meaning from being an instant to a day or longer. In radiocarbon dating, the "present" is defined as AD 1950.

It is sometimes represented as a hyperplane in space-time, typically called "now", although modern physics demonstrates that such a hyperplane can not be defined uniquely for observers in relative motion. The present may also be viewed as a duration (see specious present).

Read more about Present:  Society and Religion

Other articles related to "present":

FedEx - Advertising
... there's a FedEx for that,” 2002–2003 "Relax, it’s FedEx," 2004–2008 "We Understand," 2009–present "WeLiveToDeliver" 2009–present "Brown Bailout" 2009–present "The World On Time ...
1961 In Television - Television Shows - 1940s
... Meet the Press (1947–present) ... Candid Camera (1948–present) ... Bozo the Clown (1949–present) ...
Yatesbury - Present
... The Granary at Manor Farm, Yatesbury, was restored by the Wiltshire Historic Buildings Trust in 2006–2007 ... Famous former residents include singer/songwriter/author Julian Cope, who lived in the village until 2006 ...
1965 In Television - Television Shows - 1960s
... Coronation Street (UK) (1960–present) ... Four Corners (Australia) (1961–present) ... It's Academic (1961–present) Mister Ed (1961–1966) ...
1961 In Television - Debuts
... current affairs program, premieres (1961–present) ... October – Songs of Praise debuts on BBC (1961–present) ... CTV National News premieres (1961–present) ...

Famous quotes containing the word present:

    To think the world therefore a general Bedlam, or place of madmen, and oneself a physician, is the most necessary point of present wisdom: an important imagination, and the way to happiness.
    Thomas Traherne (1636–1674)

    There is something tragic about the enormous number of young men there are in England at the present moment who start life with perfect profiles, and end by adopting some useful profession.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    People may flatter themselves just as much by thinking that their faults are always present to other people’s minds, as if they believe that the world is always contemplating their individual charms and virtues.
    Elizabeth Gaskell (1810–1865)