Present

The present (or now) is the time that is associated with the events perceived directly and in the first time, not as a recollection (perceived more than once) or a speculation (predicted, hypothesis, uncertain). It is a period of time between the past and the future, and can vary in meaning from being an instant to a day or longer. In radiocarbon dating, the "present" is defined as AD 1950.

It is sometimes represented as a hyperplane in space-time, typically called "now", although modern physics demonstrates that such a hyperplane can not be defined uniquely for observers in relative motion. The present may also be viewed as a duration (see specious present).

Read more about Present:  Society and Religion

Other articles related to "present":

Yatesbury - Present
... The Granary at Manor Farm, Yatesbury, was restored by the Wiltshire Historic Buildings Trust in 2006–2007 ... Famous former residents include singer/songwriter/author Julian Cope, who lived in the village until 2006 ...
FedEx - Advertising
... a FedEx for that,” 2002–2003 "Relax, it’s FedEx," 2004–2008 "We Understand," 2009–present "WeLiveToDeliver" 2009–present "Brown Bailout" 2009–present "The World On Time" 2009–present ...
1961 In Television - Television Shows - 1940s
... Meet the Press (1947–present) ... Candid Camera (1948–present) ... Bozo the Clown (1949–present) ...
1965 In Television - Television Shows - 1960s
... Coronation Street (UK) (1960–present) ... Four Corners (Australia) (1961–present) ... It's Academic (1961–present) Mister Ed (1961–1966) ...
1961 In Television - Debuts
... first current affairs program, premieres (1961–present) ... October – Songs of Praise debuts on BBC (1961–present) ... CTV National News premieres (1961–present) ...

Famous quotes containing the word present:

    To complain of the age we live in, to murmur at the present possessors of power, to lament the past, to conceive extravagant hopes of the future, are the common dispositions of the greatest part of mankind.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)

    Out in Hollywood, where the streets are paved with Goldwyn, the word “sophisticate” means, very simply, “obscene.” A sophisticated story is a dirty story. Some of that meaning was wafted eastward and got itself mixed up into the present definition. So that a “sophisticate” means: one who dwells in a tower made of a DuPont substitute for ivory and holds a glass of flat champagne in one hand and an album of dirty post cards in the other.
    Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)

    The rising power of the United States in world affairs ... requires, not a more compliant press, but a relentless barrage of facts and criticism.... Our job in this age, as I see it, is not to serve as cheerleaders for our side in the present world struggle but to help the largest possible number of people to see the realities of the changing and convulsive world in which American policy must operate.
    James Reston (b. 1909)