Present

The present (or now) is the time that is associated with the events perceived directly and in the first time, not as a recollection (perceived more than once) or a speculation (predicted, hypothesis, uncertain). It is a period of time between the past and the future, and can vary in meaning from being an instant to a day or longer. In radiocarbon dating, the "present" is defined as AD 1950.

It is sometimes represented as a hyperplane in space-time, typically called "now", although modern physics demonstrates that such a hyperplane can not be defined uniquely for observers in relative motion. The present may also be viewed as a duration (see specious present).

Read more about Present:  Society and Religion

Other articles related to "present":

Yatesbury - Present
... The Granary at Manor Farm, Yatesbury, was restored by the Wiltshire Historic Buildings Trust in 2006–2007 ... Famous former residents include singer/songwriter/author Julian Cope, who lived in the village until 2006 ...
FedEx - Advertising
... it’s FedEx," 2004–2008 "We Understand," 2009–present "WeLiveToDeliver" 2009–present "Brown Bailout" 2009–present "The World On Time" 2009–present ...
1961 In Television - Television Shows - 1940s
... Meet the Press (1947–present) ... Candid Camera (1948–present) ... Bozo the Clown (1949–present) ...
1965 In Television - Television Shows - 1960s
... Coronation Street (UK) (1960–present) ... Four Corners (Australia) (1961–present) ... It's Academic (1961–present) Mister Ed (1961–1966) ...
1961 In Television - Debuts
19 – Four Corners, Australia's first current affairs program, premieres (1961–present) ... October – Songs of Praise debuts on BBC (1961–present) ... CTV National News premieres (1961–present) ...

Famous quotes containing the word present:

    No people can more exactly interpret the inmost meaning of the present situation in Ireland than the American Negro. The scheme is simple. You knock a man down and then have him arrested for assault. You kill a man and then hang the corpse.
    —W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt)

    The further our civilization advances upon its present lines so much the cheaper sort of thing does “fame” become, especially of the literary sort. This species of “fame” a waggish acquaintance says can be manufactured to order, and sometimes is so manufactured.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    The reverence for the deeds of our ancestors is a treacherous sentiment. Their merit was not to reverence the old, but to honor the present moment; and we falsely make them excuses of the very habit which they hated and defied.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)