Phrase

In everyday speech, a phrase may refer to any group of words. In linguistics, a phrase is a group of words (or sometimes a single word) that form a constituent and so function as a single unit in the syntax of a sentence. A phrase is lower on the grammatical hierarchy than a clause.

Read more about PhraseExamples, Heads and Dependents, Representing Phrases, Confusion: Phrases in Theories of Syntax, The Verb Phrase (VP) As A Source of Controversy

Other articles related to "phrase, phrases":

Focus Phrase
... "Focus Phrase" is a term traditionally used in cognitive-therapy and awareness-management discussions, and now in more general use to describe elicitor statements that evoke a desired refocusing of attention ... Psychologically related terms are elicitor phrase or statement of intent ... The psychological term "Focus Phrase" is now used by therapists and life coaches as a general term ...
Focus Phrase - Business Applications
... In corporate awareness-training, focus phrases are used not to change the outer world, but to rapidly shift inner attention, and thus alter personal experience and behavior ... to present-moment alertness, the following core focus phrase drawn both from perceptual psychology and ancient Yoga meditative tradition is used "I feel the air flowing in and out of my nose ... Elicitor statements using this general 'focus phrase technology' for mental refocusing can be used to redirect attention toward a more positive mood ("I let go of ...
The Verb Phrase (VP) As A Source of Controversy
... if not all theories of syntax acknowledge verb phrases (VPs), but they can diverge greatly in the types of verb phrases that they posit ... Phrase structure grammars acknowledge both finite verb phrases and non-finite verb phrases as constituents ... in contrast, acknowledge just non-finite verb phrases as constituents ...
When The Going Gets Tough, The Tough Get Going - Phrase
... The phrase is a play on words involving idiomatic (Proverb) and distinct meanings of "go" and "tough." In context, "the going" means "the situation," "gets tough" means "becom ...
What Would Reagan Do? - History
... The phrase derives by analogy from the earlier phrase What would Jesus do? and its related initialism WWJD, coined in the 1890s and repopularized during the 1990s ... While the phrase "What would Reagan do?" has existed since at least the early 2000s, it attained greater prominence during the 2008 Republican party presidential primary ... The phrase has also been promoted by the Heritage Foundation, in partnership with radio talk show hosts Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham, aimed at promoting policy in line with Ronald Reagan's, as well as preserving ...

Famous quotes containing the word phrase:

    It is, after all, very interesting that sound can reflect like water, like a mirror. And notice that Vinteuil’s phrase only shows me that to which I did not pay attention at the time. Of my worries, of my loves at that time, it does not recall a thing, it has made the exchange.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)

    ... that phrase of mischievous sophistry, “all men are born free and equal.” This false and futile axiom, which has done, is doing, and will do so much harm to this fine country ...
    Frances Trollope (1780–1863)

    Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion. General recognition of this fact is shown in the proverbial phrase “It is the busiest man who has time to spare.”
    C. Northcote Parkinson (1909–1993)