Phrase

In everyday speech, a phrase may refer to any group of words. In linguistics, a phrase is a group of words (or sometimes a single word) that form a constituent and so function as a single unit in the syntax of a sentence. A phrase is lower on the grammatical hierarchy than a clause.

Read more about PhraseExamples, Heads and Dependents, Representing Phrases, Confusion: Phrases in Theories of Syntax, The Verb Phrase (VP) As A Source of Controversy

Other articles related to "phrase, phrases":

The Verb Phrase (VP) As A Source of Controversy
... Most if not all theories of syntax acknowledge verb phrases (VPs), but they can diverge greatly in the types of verb phrases that they posit ... Phrase structure grammars acknowledge both finite verb phrases and non-finite verb phrases as constituents ... Dependency grammars, in contrast, acknowledge just non-finite verb phrases as constituents ...
What Would Reagan Do? - History
... The phrase derives by analogy from the earlier phrase What would Jesus do? and its related initialism WWJD, coined in the 1890s and repopularized during the 1990s ... While the phrase "What would Reagan do?" has existed since at least the early 2000s, it attained greater prominence during the 2008 Republican party ... The phrase has also been promoted by the Heritage Foundation, in partnership with radio talk show hosts Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham, aimed at promoting ...
Focus Phrase - Business Applications
... In corporate awareness-training, focus phrases are used not to change the outer world, but to rapidly shift inner attention, and thus alter personal ... alertness, the following core focus phrase drawn both from perceptual psychology and ancient Yoga meditative tradition is used "I feel the air flowing in and out of ... Elicitor statements using this general 'focus phrase technology' for mental refocusing can be used to redirect attention toward a more positive mood ("I let go of my worries, and feel peaceful ...
When The Going Gets Tough, The Tough Get Going - Phrase
... The phrase is a play on words involving idiomatic (Proverb) and distinct meanings of "go" and "tough." In context, "the going" means "the situation," "gets ...
Focus Phrase
... "Focus Phrase" is a term traditionally used in cognitive-therapy and awareness-management discussions, and now in more general use to describe elicitor statements that evoke a desired refocusing of attention ... Psychologically related terms are elicitor phrase or statement of intent ... The psychological term "Focus Phrase" is now used by therapists and life coaches as a general term ...

Famous quotes containing the word phrase:

    Preschoolers think and talk in concrete, literal terms. When they hear a phrase such as “losing your temper,” they may wonder where the lost temper can be found. Other expressions they may hear in times of crisis—raising your voice, crying your eyes out, going to pieces, falling apart, picking on each other, you follow in your father’s footsteps—may be perplexing.
    Ruth Formanek (20th century)

    An accent mark, perhaps, instead of a whole western accent—a point of punctuation rather than a uniform twang. That is how it should be worn: as a quiet point of character reference, an apt phrase of sartorial allusion—macho, sotto voce.
    Phil Patton (b. 1953)

    Rude am I in my speech,
    And little blessed with the soft phrase of peace.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)