Wright

Wright is an occupational surname originating in England. The term 'Wright' comes from the circa 700 AD Old English word 'wryhta' or 'wyrhta', meaning worker or shaper of wood. Later it became any occupational worker (for example, a shipwright is a person who builds ships), and is used as a British family name. Wright is also an anglicized version of the Scots Gaelic clan name "MacIntyre" or "Mac an t-Saoir", meaning "Son of the Wright", or "Son of the Carpenter". The word Carpentier, now Carpenter was introduced into England in 1066 and slowly replaced the traditional name and meaning of wright. Wright is the thirteenth most common surname in the United Kingdom. Its use as an occupational title continued until the mid-19th century. Its occupational use was often combined with other words such as wheelwright or playwright.

Read more about Wright:  People With The Family Name

Famous quotes containing the word wright:

    If we bring not the good courage of minds covetous of truth, and truth only, prepared to hear all things, and decide upon all things, according to evidence, we should do more wisely to sit down contented in ignorance, than to bestir ourselves only to reap disappointment.
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    ... the yearly expenses of the existing religious system ... exceed in these United States twenty millions of dollars. Twenty millions! For teaching what? Things unseen and causes unknown!... Twenty millions would more than suffice to make us wise; and alas! do they not more than suffice to make us foolish?
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)

    Persecution for opinion is the master vice of society.
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)