Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright (born Frank Lincoln Wright, June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures and completed 500 works. Wright believed in designing structures which were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by his design for Fallingwater (1935), which has been called "the best all-time work of American architecture". Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States.

His work includes original and innovative examples of many different building types, including offices, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels, and museums. Wright also designed many of the interior elements of his buildings, such as the furniture and stained glass. Wright authored 20 books and many articles and was a popular lecturer in the United States and in Europe. His colorful personal life often made headlines, most notably for the 1914 fire and murders at his Taliesin studio. Already well known during his lifetime, Wright was recognized in 1991 by the American Institute of Architects as "the greatest American architect of all time."

Read more about Frank Lloyd Wright:  Early Years, Prairie House, Mature Organic Style, Other Projects, Japanese Art, Death and Legacy, Family, Archives, Selected Works

Famous quotes containing the words lloyd wright, frank lloyd, frank, lloyd and/or wright:

    To look at the cross-section of any plan of a big city is to look at something like the section of a fibrous tumor.
    —Frank Lloyd Wright (1869–1959)

    I find it hard to believe that the machine would go into the creative artist’s hand even were that magic hand in true place. It has been too far exploited by industrialism and science at expense to art and true religion.
    Frank Lloyd Wright (1869–1959)

    Angel: You are a sourpuss, aren’t you?
    Brad: Yeah.
    Angel: You want to bite somebody?
    Brad: Yeah.
    Angel: Well, pick your spot.
    —Fredric M. Frank (1911–1977)

    The screech and mechanical uproar of the big city turns the citified head, fills citified ears—as the song of birds, wind in the trees, animal cries, or as the voices and songs of his loved ones once filled his heart. He is sidewalk- happy.
    —Frank Lloyd Wright (1869–1959)

    The life-fate of the modern individual depends not only upon the family into which he was born or which he enters by marriage, but increasingly upon the corporation in which he spends the most alert hours of his best years.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)