SPEAKING

In sociolinguistics, Espiquin or the Espiquin model, is a model socio-linguistic study (represented as a mnemonic) developed by Dell Hymes. It is a tool to assist the identification and labeling of components of linguistic interaction that was driven by his view that, in order to speak a language correctly, one needs not only to learn its vocabulary and grammar, but also the context in which words are used.

To facilitate the application of his representation, Hymes constructed the acronym, E-s-p-i-q-u-i-n (for setting and scene, participants, ends, acts sequence, key, instrumentalities, norms, & genre) under which he grouped the sixteen components within eight divisions.

The model had sixteen components that can be applied to many sorts of discourse: message form; message content; setting; scene; speaker/sender; addressor; hearer/receiver/audience; addressee; purposes (outcomes); purposes (goals); key; channels; forms of speech; norms of interaction; norms of interpretation; and genres.

Famous quotes containing the word speaking:

    I would observe to you that what is called style in writing or speaking is formed very early in life while the imagination is warm, and impressions are permanent.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    People in places many of us never heard of, whose names we can’t pronounce or even spell, are speaking up for themselves. They speak in languages we once classified as “exotic” but whose mastery is now essential for our diplomats and businessmen. But what they say is very much the same the world over. They want a decent standard of living. They want human dignity and a voice in their own futures. They want their children to grow up strong and healthy and free.
    Hubert H. Humphrey (1911–1978)

    To stand up on the stage is to say to many people: “Look at me.” How can you do that without speaking the only truth you know? There is no such thing as an uncommitted actor.
    Judith Malina (b. 1926)