Singh

Singh /ˈsɪŋ/ is a common title, middle name, or surname used in South Asia, mainly in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, used originally by the Hindu Kshatriyas (warriors and kings). It is derived from the Sanskrit word Siṃha meaning Lion. Apart from Rajput clans, it is also used by Sikhs, Marathas, Sinhalese people of Sri Lanka and Newa people of Nepal.

The surname of "Singh" is used mainly by Rajput clans, jats and followers of Sikh religion. The Rajputs were the first group to widely start using Singh as a last name. It was later adopted into Sikhism in 1699 as per the instructions of Guru Gobind Singh, the use of Singh as a last name is mandatory for all baptized male Sikhs since 1699, regardless of their geographical or cultural binding. The surname has also been widely adopted by other groups of India like Gurjars, Jats and Yadavs. Some Brahmins like Bhumihar Brahmins (see Kingdom of Kashi and Royal House of Benares) and Maithil Brahmins (see History of Mithila) also use this name. "Singh" has gradually emerged as a hereditary title to be used as a middle name, highlighting connections to a warrior status or occupation.

Read more about Singh:  Etymology, History, Naming Patterns, Immigration Issues: Common Surname

Famous quotes containing the word singh:

    We may die today, we may die tomorrow,
    so why worry about this death?
    Punjabi proverb, trans. by Gurinder Singh Mann.

    There is nothing like the fun of having brothers,
    if there is no rivalry.
    There is nothing like the fun of summer rains,
    if there is no mud.
    There is nothing like the fun of gambling,
    if there is no loss.
    Punjabi proverb, trans. by Gurinder Singh Mann.

    When a rich man’s dog died, everyone commiserated. When a poor man lost his mother, no one noticed.
    Punjabi proverb, trans. by Gurinder Singh Mann.