Silver

Silver is a metallic chemical element with the chemical symbol Ag (Greek: άργυρος <árgyros>, Latin: argentum, both from the Indo-European root *arg- for "grey" or "shining") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it has the highest electrical conductivity of any element and the highest thermal conductivity of any metal. The metal occurs naturally in its pure, free form (native silver), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

Silver has long been valued as a precious metal, and is used as an investment, to make ornaments, jewelry, high-value tableware, utensils (hence the term silverware), and currency coins. Today, silver metal is also used in electrical contacts and conductors, in mirrors and in catalysis of chemical reactions. Its compounds are used in photographic film, and dilute silver nitrate solutions and other silver compounds are used as disinfectants and microbiocides (oligodynamic effect). While many medical antimicrobial uses of silver have been supplanted by antibiotics, further research into clinical potential continues.

Read more about Silver:  Characteristics, Isotopes, Compounds, Applications, History, Occurrence and Extraction, Price, Human Exposure and Consumption

Famous quotes containing the word silver:

    “Maman”, said Annaïse, her voice strangely weak. “Here is the water.”
    A thin blade of silver came forward in the plain and the peasants ran alongside it, crying and singing.
    ...
    “Oh, Manuel, Manuel, why are you dead?” moaned Délira.
    “No”, said Annaïse, and she smiled through her tears, “no, he is not dead”.
    She took the old woman’s hand and pressed gently against her belly where new life stirred.
    Jacques Roumain (1907–1945)

    no thread
    Of cloudy silver sprinkles in your gown
    Its venom of renown, and on your head
    No crown is simpler than the simple hair.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    Indeed, I thought, slipping the silver into my purse ... what a change of temper a fixed income will bring about. No force in the world can take from me my five hundred pounds. Food, house and clothing are mine for ever. Therefore not merely do effort and labour cease, but also hatred and bitterness. I need not hate any man; he cannot hurt me. I need not flatter any man; he has nothing to give me.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)