Sequence

In mathematics, a sequence is an ordered list of objects (or events). Like a set, it contains members (also called elements, or terms). The number of ordered elements (possibly infinite) is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, order matters, and exactly the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in the sequence. A sequence is a discrete function.

For example, (M, A, R, Y) is a sequence of letters that differs from (A, R, M, Y), as the ordering matters, and (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8), which contains the number 1 at two different positions, is a valid sequence. Sequences can be finite, as in this example, or infinite, such as the sequence of all even positive integers (2, 4, 6,...). Finite sequences are sometimes known as strings or words and infinite sequences as streams. The empty sequence ( ) is included in most notions of sequence, but may be excluded depending on the context.

Read more about Sequence:  Examples and Notation, Types and Properties, Analysis, Series, Infinite Sequences in Theoretical Computer Science, Vectors, Doubly Infinite Sequences, Ordinal-indexed Sequence, Sequences and Automata

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    Reminiscences, even extensive ones, do not always amount to an autobiography.... For autobiography has to do with time, with sequence and what makes up the continuous flow of life. Here, I am talking of a space, of moments and discontinuities. For even if months and years appear here, it is in the form they have in the moment of recollection. This strange form—it may be called fleeting or eternal—is in neither case the stuff that life is made of.
    Walter Benjamin (1892–1940)