Prime Time - Timeslot's Relationship To Radio and TV Revenue

Timeslot's Relationship To Radio and TV Revenue

Prime time is the daypart (block of a day's programming schedule) with the most viewers and is generally where television networks and local stations reap much of their advertising revenues. The Nielsen ratings system is explicitly designed for the optimum measurement of audience viewership by dayparts with prime time being of most interest. Most people tend to watch television at prime time because most people who are usually tired coming home from work or school tend to watch TV, usually right after dinner. This is usually the main reason for the high ratings for TV programming at this time, as well as the attractiveness of the timeslot for advertisers.

The existence of prime time in the United States is largely an artifact of now repealed regulations of the Federal Communications Commission, which limited the number of hours that a network can require its affiliates to broadcast.

Additionally, networks may also choose to provide local affiliates the opportunity to air sporting events or other special events which may fall outside of standard designated network broadcast times. Prime time for radio is called “Drive time” and, in Eastern and Pacific Time, is 6–10 a.m. and 3–7 p.m. and, for Mountain and Central Time, is 5–9 a.m. and 2–6 p.m..

Read more about this topic:  Prime Time

Famous quotes containing the words relationship, radio and/or revenue:

    Only men of moral and mental force, of a patriotic regard for the relationship of the two races, can be of real service as ministers in the South. Less theology and more of human brotherhood, less declamation and more common sense and love for truth, must be the qualifications of the new ministry that shall yet save the race from the evils of false teaching.
    Fannie Barrier Williams (1855–1944)

    There was a girl who was running the traffic desk, and there was a woman who was on the overnight for radio as a producer, and my desk assistant was a woman. So when the world came to an end, we took over.
    Marya McLaughlin, U.S. television newswoman. As quoted in Women in Television News, ch. 3, by Judith S. Gelfman (1976)

    If you tax too high, the revenue will yield nothing.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)