Preservation

Preservation may refer to:

  • Heritage preservation:
    • Historic preservation, of buildings, monuments, etc.
    • Preservation (library and archival science), of books, recordings, etc.
    • Digital preservation, of digitized and born-digital information
    • Conservation (ethic), of the natural environment
    • Conservation-restoration, of artworks
  • Preservative, chemical to hinder deterioration of food, wood, etc.
    • Food preservation
  • Self-preservation, part of an animal's fundamental instinct which demands that the organism survive
  • Case preservation, when computer storage preserves the distinction between upper and lower case
  • Preservation: Acts 1 & 2, albums by The Kinks
  • Preservation Hall, jazz venue in New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Preservation Island Group, Tasmania, Australia:
    • Preservation Island
    • Preservation Islets
  • Assurance (theology), an aspect of Salvation
  • Preservation (magazine), published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation

In safety and technology:

  • Dust resistant
  • Fire resistant
  • Rot-proof
  • Rustproof
  • Thermal resistant
  • Impact resistant
  • Waterproof

Famous quotes containing the word preservation:

    The bourgeois treasures nothing more highly than the self.... And so at the cost of intensity he achieves his own preservation and security. His harvest is a quiet mind which he prefers to being possessed by God, as he prefers comfort to pleasure, convenience to liberty, and a pleasant temperature to that deathly inner consuming fire.
    Hermann Hesse (1877–1962)

    Men are not therefore put to death, or punished for that their theft proceedeth from election; but because it was noxious and contrary to men’s preservation, and the punishment conducing to the preservation of the rest, inasmuch as to punish those that do voluntary hurt, and none else, frameth and maketh men’s wills such as men would have them.
    Thomas Hobbes (1579–1688)

    The bourgeois treasures nothing more highly than the self.... And so at the cost of intensity he achieves his own preservation and security. His harvest is a quiet mind which he prefers to being possessed by God, as he prefers comfort to pleasure, convenience to liberty, and a pleasant temperature to that deathly inner consuming fire.
    Hermann Hesse (1877–1962)