Phrase

In everyday speech, a phrase may refer to any group of words. In linguistics, a phrase is a group of words (or sometimes a single word) that form a constituent and so function as a single unit in the syntax of a sentence. A phrase is lower on the grammatical hierarchy than a clause.

Read more about Phrase:  Examples, Heads and Dependents, Representing Phrases, Confusion: Phrases in Theories of Syntax, The Verb Phrase (VP) As A Source of Controversy

Famous quotes containing the word phrase:

    ... that phrase of mischievous sophistry, “all men are born free and equal.” This false and futile axiom, which has done, is doing, and will do so much harm to this fine country ...
    Frances Trollope (1780–1863)

    An accent mark, perhaps, instead of a whole western accent—a point of punctuation rather than a uniform twang. That is how it should be worn: as a quiet point of character reference, an apt phrase of sartorial allusion—macho, sotto voce.
    Phil Patton (b. 1953)

    Mormon colonization south of this point in early times was characterized as “going over the Rim,” and in colloquial usage the same phrase came to connote violent death.
    State of Utah, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)