Outline of Category Theory

Outline Of Category Theory

The following outline is provided as an overview of and guide to category theory:

Category theory – area of study in mathematics that examines in an abstract way the properties of particular mathematical concepts, by formalising them as collections of objects and arrows (also called morphisms, although this term also has a specific, non category-theoretical sense), where these collections satisfy certain basic conditions. Many significant areas of mathematics can be formalised as categories, and the use of category theory allows many intricate and subtle mathematical results in these fields to be stated, and proved, in a much simpler way than without the use of categories.

Read more about Outline Of Category TheoryEssence of Category Theory, Branches of Category Theory, Specific Categories, Objects, Morphisms, Functors, Limits, Additive Structure, Dagger Categories, Monoidal Categories, Structure, Topoi, Toposes, History of Category Theory

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Outline Of Category Theory - History of Category Theory
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