Object

Object may refer to:

  • Object (philosophy), a thing, being or concept
    • Entity, something that is tangible and within the grasp of the senses
  • As used in object relations theory of psychoanalysis, that to which a subject relates
  • Object (grammar), a sentence element, such as a direct object or an indirect object
  • Object (abstract), an object which does not exist at any particular time or place
  • Object (mathematics), an abstract object arising in mathematics
  • Group object, a generalization of a group built on more complicated structures than sets
  • Goal, an aim, target or objective
  • Physical body or object, in physics, a collection of masses
  • Object, an entity treated by mathematical category theory
  • 3D model, a representation of a physical object
  • Object (National Register of Historic Places), a classification used by the U.S. National Register of Historic Places
  • Объект (object); Russian GABTU military vehicle designations

In computing:

  • Object (computer science), a language mechanism for binding data with methods that operate on that data
    • Object-oriented programming (OOP), in which an object is an instance of a class or array
  • Object file, the output of a compiler or other translator program (also known as "object code")
  • Object (Information Processing), an information source for an information processor
  • HTML object element

In popular culture:

  • Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure), a sculpture by Méret Oppenheim
  • Object, a song by The Cure on their 1979 album Three Imaginary Boys
  • Objects from the 2006 television series The Lost Room
  • "Object", a song by Ween from La Cucaracha

Famous quotes containing the word object:

    The object of government in peace and in war is not the glory of rulers or of races, but the happiness of the common man.
    William, Lord Beveridge (1879–1963)

    The great object in life is Sensation—to feel that we exist, even though in pain; it is this “craving void” which drives us to gaming, to battle, to travel, to intemperate but keenly felt pursuits of every description whose principal attraction is the agitation inseparable from their accomplishment.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)

    The aim of science is to apprehend this purely intelligible world as a thing in itself, an object which is what it is independently of all thinking, and thus antithetical to the sensible world.... The world of thought is the universal, the timeless and spaceless, the absolutely necessary, whereas the world of sense is the contingent, the changing and moving appearance which somehow indicates or symbolizes it.
    —R.G. (Robin George)