Object

Object may refer to:

  • Object (philosophy), a thing, being or concept
    • Entity, something that is tangible and within the grasp of the senses
  • As used in object relations theory of psychoanalysis, that to which a subject relates
  • Object (grammar), a sentence element, such as a direct object or an indirect object
  • Object (abstract), an object which does not exist at any particular time or place
  • Object (mathematics), an abstract object arising in mathematics
  • Group object, a generalization of a group built on more complicated structures than sets
  • Goal, an aim, target or objective
  • Physical body or object, in physics, a collection of masses
  • Object, an entity treated by mathematical category theory
  • 3D model, a representation of a physical object
  • Object (National Register of Historic Places), a classification used by the U.S. National Register of Historic Places
  • Объект (object); Russian GABTU military vehicle designations

In computing:

  • Object (computer science), a language mechanism for binding data with methods that operate on that data
    • Object-oriented programming (OOP), in which an object is an instance of a class or array
  • Object file, the output of a compiler or other translator program (also known as "object code")
  • Object (Information Processing), an information source for an information processor
  • HTML object element

In popular culture:

  • Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure), a sculpture by Méret Oppenheim
  • Object, a song by The Cure on their 1979 album Three Imaginary Boys
  • Objects from the 2006 television series The Lost Room
  • "Object", a song by Ween from La Cucaracha

Famous quotes containing the word object:

    The opinion which is fated to be ultimately agreed to by all who investigate, is what we mean by the truth, and the object represented in this opinion is the real. That is the way I would explain reality.
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)

    He who is in love is wise and is becoming wiser, sees newly every time he looks at the object beloved, drawing from it with his eyes and his mind those virtues which it possesses.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Life at its noblest leaves mere happiness far behind; and indeed cannnot endure it.... Happiness is not the object of life: life has no object: it is an end in itself; and courage consists in the readiness to sacrifice happiness for an intenser quality of life.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)