Who is percy bysshe shelley?

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (/ˈpɜrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/; 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded as among the finest lyric poets in the English language. A radical in his poetry as well as his political and social views, Shelley did not achieve fame during his lifetime, but recognition for his poetry grew steadily following his death. Shelley was a key member of a close circle of visionary poets and writers that included Lord Byron; Leigh Hunt; Thomas Love Peacock; and his own second wife, Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein.

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    Men of England, wherefore plough
    For the lords who lay ye low?
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    The One remains, the many change and pass;
    Heaven’s light forever shines, Earth’s shadows fly;
    Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass,
    Stains the white radiance of Eternity,
    Until Death tramples it to fragments.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    ‘I feared, loved, hated, suffered, did and died,
    And if the spark with which Heaven lit my spirit
    Had been with purer nutriment supplied,
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    He has outsoared the shadow of our night;
    Envy and calumny and hate and pain,
    And that unrest which men miscall delight,
    Can touch him not and torture not again;
    From the contagion of the world’s slow stain
    He is secure, and now can never mourn
    A heart grown cold, a head grown grey in vain.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    Familiar acts are beautiful through love.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)