Who is percy bysshe shelley?

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (/ˈpɜrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/; 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded as among the finest lyric poets in the English language. A radical in his poetry as well as his political and social views, Shelley did not achieve fame during his lifetime, but recognition for his poetry grew steadily following his death. Shelley was a key member of a close circle of visionary poets and writers that included Lord Byron; Leigh Hunt; Thomas Love Peacock; and his own second wife, Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein.

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    The Galilean is not a favourite of mine. So far from owing him any thanks for his favour, I cannot avoid confessing that I owe a secret grudge to his carpentership.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    Thou shoreless flood, which in thy ebb and flow
    Claspest the limits of mortality,
    And sick of prey, yet howling on for more,
    Vomitest thy wrecks on its inhospitable shore;
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds; his auditors are as men entranced by the melody of an unseen musician, who feel that they are moved and softened, yet know not whence or why.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    In honored poverty thy voice did weave
    Songs consecrate to truth and liberty;—
    Deserting these, thou leavest me to grieve,
    Thus having been, that thou shouldst cease to be.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    Ah, woe is me! Winter is come and gone,
    But grief returns with the revolving year.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)