Who is percy bysshe shelley?

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (/ˈpɜrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/; 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded as among the finest lyric poets in the English language. A radical in his poetry as well as his political and social views, Shelley did not achieve fame during his lifetime, but recognition for his poetry grew steadily following his death. Shelley was a key member of a close circle of visionary poets and writers that included Lord Byron; Leigh Hunt; Thomas Love Peacock; and his own second wife, Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein.

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Famous quotes containing the words percy bysshe shelley, bysshe shelley, percy bysshe, bysshe and/or shelley:

    and so this tree—
    Oh, that such our death may be!—
    Died in sleep, and felt no pain,
    To live in happier form again:
    From which, beneath Heaven’s fairest star,
    The artist wrought this loved guitar;
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    In honored poverty thy voice did weave
    Songs consecrate to truth and liberty;—
    Deserting these, thou leavest me to grieve,
    Thus having been, that thou shouldst cease to be.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    There grew pied wind-flowers and violets,
    Daisies, those pearl’d Arcturi of the earth,
    The constellated flower that never sets;
    Faint oxlips; tender bluebells at whose birth
    The sod scarce heaved; and that tall flower that wets
    Its mother’s face with heaven-collected tears,
    When the low wind, its playmate’s voice, it hears.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    His very words are instinct with spirit; each is as a spark, a burning atom of inextinguishable thought; and many yet lie covered in the ashes of their birth and pregnant with a lightning which has yet found no conductor.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    The beauty of the internal nature cannot be so far concealed by its accidental vesture, but that the spirit of its form shall communicate itself to the very disguise and indicate the shape it hides from the manner in which it is worn. A majestic form and graceful motions will express themselves through the most barbarous and tasteless costume.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)