Nomination

Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. In government also

In the context of elections for public office, a candidate who has been selected by a political party is normally said to be the nominee of that party. The party's selection (that is, the nomination) is typically accomplished either based on one or more primary elections or by means of a political party convention or caucus, according to the rules of the party and any applicable election laws.

In some jurisdictions the nominee of a recognized political party is entitled to appear on the general election ballot paper. Candidates who are unaffiliated with any political party are typically required to submit a nominating petition in order to gain ballot access. In others all candidates have to meet nomination rules criteria to stand.

Candidate comes from the Latin word "candida" (white). In Ancient Rome, people running for political office would often wear togas chalked and bleached to be bright white. Such garments would be worn by candidates at speeches, debates, conventions, and other public functions.

In parliamentary procedure, there are a number of motions relating to nominations.


Famous quotes containing the word nomination:

    In ancient times—’twas no great loss—
    They hung the thief upon the cross:
    But now, alas!—I say’t with grief—
    They hang the cross upon the thief.
    —Anonymous. “On a Nomination to the Legion of Honour,” from Aubrey Stewart’s English Epigrams and Epitaphs (1897)

    I shall not seek and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your President.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    Do you know I believe that [William Jennings] Bryan will force his nomination on the Democrats again. I believe he will either do this by advocating Prohibition, or else he will run on a Prohibition platform independent of the Democrats. But you will see that the year before the election he will organize a mammoth lecture tour and will make Prohibition the leading note of every address.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)