Native

Native

The term "native" can have many different social and political connotations in different contexts. In some cases it is a neutral, descriptive term, for example, when stating that one is a native of a particular city or that a certain language is one's native language. However, in the context of colonialism—in particular, British colonialism—the term "natives", as applied to the inhabitants of colonies, assumed a disparaging and patronising sense, implying that the people concerned were incapable of taking care of themselves and in need of Europeans to administer their lives; therefore, these people resent the use of the term and consider it insulting, and at present English speakers usually avoid using it. This connotation has also led to controversy over the preference of the terms Native American or American Indians, though this controversy has resulted in either term being acceptable to most American Indians. And in the context of Nativism, in some periods a potent political force, "natives" are defined as a (predominantly white) group deserving of a special privileged position in comparison to immigrants.

"Native" may also refer to:

  • Native metal
  • Native (comics), a character in the X-Men comics universe

Read more about Native:  Nationality and Language, Music, Ecology, Computing, Other

Famous quotes containing the word native:

    There can be no more ancient and traditional American value than ignorance. English-only speakers brought it with them to this country three centuries ago, and they quickly imposed it on the Africans—who were not allowed to learn to read and write—and on the Native Americans, who were simply not allowed.
    Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941)

    At length they all to merry London came,
    To merry London, my most kindly nurse,
    That to me gave this life’s first native source;
    Though from another place I take my name,
    An house of ancient fame.
    Edmund Spenser (1552?–1599)

    Criticism is often not a science; it is a craft, requiring more good health than wit, more hard work than talent, more habit than native genius. In the hands of a man who has read widely but lacks judgment, applied to certain subjects it can corrupt both its readers and the writer himself.
    —Jean De La Bruyère (1645–1696)