Who is anna garlin spencer?

Anna Garlin Spencer

Anna Garlin Spencer (1851–1931) was an American educator, feminist, and Unitarian minister. Born in Attleboro, MA, she married the Rev. William H. Spencer in 1878. She was a leader in the women's suffrage and peace movements. In 1891 she became the first woman ordained as a minister in the state of Rhode Island. In Providence she was commissioned to develop the Religious Society of Bell Street Chapel which was to be devoted to the religious outlook of James Eddy. She compiled Eddy’s views into a Bond of Union to which members of the new society would subscribe. She was later associated with the New York Society for Ethical Culture (1903–1909) and the New York School of Philanthropy (1903–1913). In 1909, she signed onto the call to found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Over a long period she was a popular lecturer and wrote on social problems, especially concerning women and family relations. Her writings include Woman's Share in Social Culture (1913) and The Family and Its Members (1922).

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Famous quotes containing the words garlin spencer, anna garlin, garlin and/or spencer:

    Women of a selected class, by the use of slaves and servants have become inactive, the mere recipients of values, no longer creators but “feeding on unearned wealth.” This hurts their nature and debases the social fabric. If a woman does no labor in her home which could properly make her self-supporting outside that home she is in duty bound to do something outside her home to justify her claim to support.
    —Anna Garlin Spencer (1851–1931)

    A successful woman preacher was once asked “what special obstacles have you met as a woman in the ministry?” “Not one,” she answered, “except the lack of a minister’s wife.”
    Anna Garlin Spencer (1851–1931)

    The experience of the race shows that we get our most important education not through books but through our work. We are developed by our daily task, or else demoralized by it, as by nothing else.
    —Anna Garlin Spencer (1851–1931)

    Here the sausage and garlic booth
    Sent unholy incense skyward;
    There a quivering female-thing
    Gestured assignations, and lied
    To call it dancing;
    —Anne Spencer (1882–1975)