Metatarsus - Injuries

Injuries

The metatarsal bones are often broken by soccer players. These and other recent cases have been attributed to the modern lightweight design of football boots, which give less protection to the foot. In 2010 some soccer players began trialling a new sock that incorporated a rubber silicon pad over the foot to provide protection to the top of the foot.

The metatarsal bone injury gained notoriety with soccer fans when the then Deportivo La Coruña midfielder Aldo Duscher made a strong tackle on David Beckham breaking his second metatarsal bone and his participation in the 2002 World Cup became doubtful. Beckham eventually made it to the England 2002 World Cup squad. Since then, Wayne Rooney, Steven Gerrard, Roy Keane, Xabi Alonso and Michael Owen have gone down the same road alongside many others.

Stress fractures are thought to account for 16% of injuries related to sports preparation, and the metatarsals are most often involved. These fractures are commonly called march fractures, as they were commonly diagnosed among military recruits after long marches. The second and third metatarsals are fixed while walking, thus these metatarsals are common sites of injury. The fifth metatarsal may be fractured if the foot is oversupinated during locomotion.

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Famous quotes containing the word injuries:

    The only thing of weight that can be said against modern honour is that it is directly opposite to religion. The one bids you bear injuries with patience, the other tells you if you don’t resent them, you are not fit to live.
    Bernard Mandeville (1670–1733)

    Men are not only apt to forget the kindnesses and injuries that have been done them, but which is a great deal more, they hate the persons that have obliged them, and lay aside their resentments against those that have used them ill. The trouble of returning favors and revenging wrongs is a slavery, it seems, which they can very hardly submit to.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)