Memory Span

In psychology and neuroscience, memory span is the longest list of items that a person can repeat back in correct order immediately after presentation on 50% of all trials. Items may include words, numbers, or letters. The task is known as digit span when numbers are used. Memory span is a common measure of short-term memory. It is also a component of cognitive ability tests such as the WAIS. Backward memory span is a more challenging variation which involves recalling items in reverse order.

Read more about Memory Span:  Memory Span As Functional Aspect, Memory Span As Structural Aspect, Factors Which Affect Memory Span, Digit-span, The Memory Span Procedure, From Simple Span To Complex Span, The Role of Interference in Memory Span

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