Loss

Loss may refer to:

  • A negative difference between retail price and cost of production
    • Loss leader a deliberate commercial loss made in the expectation of recouping it by profitable sales of other lines
  • An event in which the team or individual in question did not win
  • Loss (baseball), a pitching statistic in baseball
  • Attenuation, a reduction in amplitude and intensity of a signal
  • In telecommunications, loss is a decrease in signal in a communications system:
    • Angular misalignment loss, power loss caused by the deviation from optimum angular alignment
    • Bridging loss, the loss that results when an impedance is connected across a transmission line
    • Coupling loss, the loss that occurs when energy is transferred from one circuit, optical device, or medium to another
    • Insertion loss, the decrease in transmitted signal power resulting from the insertion of a device in a transmission line or optical fiber
    • Path loss, the attenuation undergone by an electromagnetic wave in transit from a transmitter to a receiver
      • Free-space path loss, the loss in signal strength that would result if all influences were sufficiently removed having no effect on its propagation
    • Return loss, the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected wave to the amplitude of the incident wave
  • Round-trip loss in laser physics refers to energy lost due to scattering or absorption
  • Loss function, in statistics, a function representing the cost associated with an event

Read more about Loss:  Arts

Famous quotes containing the word loss:

    The cheapness of man is every day’s tragedy. It is as real a loss that others should be low, as that we should be low; for we must have a society.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Our ego ideal is precious to us because it repairs a loss of our earlier childhood, the loss of our image of self as perfect and whole, the loss of a major portion of our infantile, limitless, ain’t-I-wonderful narcissism which we had to give up in the face of compelling reality. Modified and reshaped into ethical goals and moral standards and a vision of what at our finest we might be, our dream of perfection lives on—our lost narcissism lives on—in our ego ideal.
    Judith Viorst (20th century)

    The universal social pressure upon women to be all alike, and do all the same things, and to be content with identical restrictions, has resulted not only in terrible suffering in the lives of exceptional women, but also in the loss of unmeasured feminine values in special gifts. The Drama of the Woman of Genius has too often been a tragedy of misshapen and perverted power.
    Anna Garlin Spencer (1851–1931)