Folk

The English word Folk is derived from a Germanic noun, *fulka meaning "people" or "army" (i.e. a crowd as opposed to "a people" in a more abstract sense of clan or tribe). The English word folk has cognates in most of the other Germanic languages. Folk may be a Germanic root that is unique to the Germanic languages, although Latin vulgus, "the common people", has been suggested as a possible cognate.

Read more about Folk:  Etymology, Cognates in Other Germanic Language

Famous quotes containing the word folk:

    Do you know what a soldier is, young man? He’s the chap who makes it possible for civilised folk to despise war.
    Allan Massie (b. 1938)

    The ties between gentle folk are as pure as water; the links between scoundrels are as thick as honey.
    Chinese proverb.

    the yonge sonne
    Hath in the Ram his halfe cours yronne,
    And smale foweles maken melodye,
    That slepen al the nyght with open eye—
    So priketh hem nature in hir corages—
    Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
    Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?–1400)