Folk

The English word Folk is derived from a Germanic noun, *fulka meaning "people" or "army" (i.e. a crowd as opposed to "a people" in a more abstract sense of clan or tribe). The English word folk has cognates in most of the other Germanic languages. Folk may be a Germanic root that is unique to the Germanic languages, although Latin vulgus, "the common people", has been suggested as a possible cognate.

Read more about Folk:  Etymology, Cognates in Other Germanic Language

Famous quotes containing the word folk:

    An’ when the earth’s as cauld’s the mune
    An’ a’ its folk are lang syne deid,
    On coontless stars the Babe maun cry
    An’ the Crucified maun bleed.
    Hugh MacDiarmid (1892–1978)

    “I have usually found that there was method in his madness.”
    “Some folk might say there was madness in his method.”
    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930)

    In the past, the English tried to impose a system wherever they went. They destroyed the nation’s culture and one of the by- products of their systemisation was that they destroyed their own folk culture.
    Martin Carthy (b. 1941)