List of Italian American Actors

List Of Italian American Actors

To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Italian American actors or must have references showing they are Italian American actors and are notable. As discussed in the 2005 book Hollywood Italians by Peter E. Bondanella, as well as numerous other sources, Italian-American actors have made a significant impact. The Guild of Italian American Actors was founded in 1937.

The list is organized chronologically, listing Italian American actors by birth date periods.

Read more about List Of Italian American Actors:  1990s, 1980s, 1970s, 1960s, 1950s, 1940s, 1930s, 1920s, 1910s, 1900s, 1890s, 1880s, Non-Italian American Actors, Voice Actors, The Godfather Actors, The Sopranos Actors

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    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Religious literature has eminent examples, and if we run over our private list of poets, critics, philanthropists and philosophers, we shall find them infected with this dropsy and elephantiasis, which we ought to have tapped.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

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    Alessandra Mussolini, Italian actor, politician, and medical student. As quoted in Newsweek magazine, p. 19 (February 17, 1992)

    It is always dangerous to generalise, but the American people, while infinitely generous, are a hard and strong race and, but for the few cemeteries I have seen, I am inclined to think they never die.
    Margot Asquith (1864–1945)

    To save the theatre, the theatre must be destroyed, the actors and actresses must all die of the plague. They poison the air, they make art impossible. It is not drama that they play, but pieces for the theatre. We should return to the Greeks, play in the open air: the drama dies of stalls and boxes and evening dress, and people who come to digest their dinner.
    Eleonora Duse (1858–1924)