Knot

A knot is a method of fastening or securing linear material such as rope by tying or interweaving. It may consist of a length of one or several segments of rope, string, webbing, twine, strap, or even chain interwoven such that the line can bind to itself or to some other object—the "load". Knots have been the subject of interest for their ancient origins, their common uses, and the area of mathematics known as knot theory.

Read more about Knot:  Use, Categories, Knot Theory

Famous quotes containing the word knot:

    I love him who does not want to have too many virtues. One virtue is more virtue than two, since it is more knot on which to hang the rope that is destined to hang him.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    Brutus. How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,
    That now on Pompey’s basis lies along,
    No worthier than the dust!
    Cassius. So oft as that shall be,
    So often shall the knot of us be called
    The men that gave their country liberty.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Not the less does nature continue to fill the heart of youth with suggestions of his enthusiasm, and there are now men,—if indeed I can speak in the plural number,—more exactly, I will say, I have just been conversing with one man, to whom no weight of adverse experience will make it for a moment appear impossible, that thousands of human beings might exercise towards each other the grandest and simplest of sentiments, as well as a knot of friends, or a pair of lovers.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)